Genital Integrity Awareness Week 2018


Registration and Sponsorship also at:

Genital Integrity Awareness Week 2018 takes place March 28-April 3 and we need your help to make this year's Washington D.C. event a powerful one! As advocates travel to D.C. to participate, and floods of tourists the world over gather in D.C. for the height of the annual Cherry Blossom Festival, we strive to have intact materials on hand to reach a large number of people at our nation's capitol. These are items that parents and professionals, young and old, from all backgrounds and locations in life will want to take home with them for further review. Making this happen takes a significant amount of planning, organization, and resources on the part of many people, and it also takes financial support.


If you have never been to GIAW in D.C., here's a quick snapshot of a day's event:

We are standing with a dozen others in front of the U.S. Capitol, with giant pro-intact signs that draw people in, and can be seen from the streets all around the Capitol's bus route. A group of 200 senior high students come up, interested in what we have to share. Teachers shuffle students along for group photos, and we have mere minutes to plant seeds of information, respond to quick questions, and get interesting materials into hands of these future parents -- materials they eagerly take with them because their curiosity is spiked! Students grab things to take back on the bus (bracelets, cards, stickers, buttons), and look things up on their phone on their way to their next destination... This happens every single hour. Multiple times a day. Sun-up to sun-down. The need is great for GIAW. The impact is monumental. And we need your support in this important effort.

We will also be hosting two booths with free materials on the West Lawn:

The Men's Health table includes a variety of restoration devices for men to hold, learn about, and explore their options; information on adult sexual health, and the impact that genital cutting and restoration has on adult men and their partners.

The Baby Health table includes instruments used in infant circumcision, information on the purposes of the foreskin, intact care materials, and resources for parents to pass on to friends and their home care provider. This table also has items for our young visitors because families who stop to talk often have children who want things of their own (child sized bracelets, stickers, bubbles, coloring pages, etc.).


Business Sponsors: Please include a note with your GIAW contribution and your organization name/URL that you'd like to have linked (website, Facebook page, etc.). With your support of $100 or more, we invite you to provide an image/logo or coupon to be shared with the community at large. Email this to SavingSons@gmail.com, or we will create one for you. Your business or group will be featured at at the main GIAW website, at DrMomma.org, and at SavingSons.org, as well as with social media circles of Peaceful ParentingSaving Our Sons, The Intact NetworkGIAW, Intact State Chapters, and be permanently linked at Genital Integrity Awareness Week and found on Google.

GIAW Sponsors:  2018  |  2017  |  2016  |  2015  |  2014  |  2013

Individuals: If you are sponsoring in honor of someone, we invite you to include a message with your gift and it will be included below. Individual sponsors will be listed by first name, last initial only for privacy.

Supporters: All supporting GIAW 2018 with your gift of any amount will receive commemorative vinyl decals with additional intact awareness stickers to plant in your area, if a mailing address is provided. For GIAW sponsors giving $25 or more, a registration pack (below) will be shipped, or can be picked up in DC.

Support on Etsy, or by PayPal, or by mail (below). Include a note with your address and selection choices, or email this to SavingSons@gmail.com

Registration and Thank You packs include: 
• 3 GIAW 2018 / Child Abuse Prevention Month vinyl decal stickers (3x3 inches)
• 1 GIAW 2018 commemorative button
• 1 #i2 lanyard of your choice (4 options to view here: Navy, Ocean, Violet, Hot Pink)
• 1 #i2 bracelet of your choice (view options)
• 25 set of stickers or cards of your choice (see sticker options here | see card options here)
* If attending GIAW and picking up in DC: #i2 water bottle 


On behalf of the next generation of babies to be born, and the adults they will become -
Thank you for supporting GIAW!




By Mail:
Saving Our Sons
P.O. Box 1302
Virginia Beach, VA 23451

PayPal Friends/Family To:
(no PayPal fee withdrawn)
SavingSons@gmail.com


GIAW 2018 Organization Sponsors
Please visit and support these intact-friendly businesses and groups!


Intact Australia
Homepage | Facebook | Intact Australia & New Zealand Group

Intact Connecticut
Facebook | Intact Connecticut Group

Made For You: By Anu
custom crochet for all your home and family needs
Contact | Facebook | Etsy

Babies Happen ~ Lindsey Ward
BabiesHappen.com | Facebook
• Birth and Postpartum Doula
• Stillbirthday Certified Birth and Bereavement Doula
• Placenta Preparation and Encapsulation Specialist
Serving the Virginia areas of Fauquier, Culpeper, Prince William, Stafford, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Clarke counties, Winchester, Manassas, Fairfax City, and Fredericksburg.

Intact Virginia
Facebook | Intact Virginia Group

Intact New Hampshire
Facebook | Intact New Hampshire Group

Peaceful Beginnings from Rosemary
Rosemary Romberg, author of Circumcision: The Painful Dilemma

NORM: National Organization of Restoring Men
NORM.org | Facebook | Twitter

Peaceful Pendants by Michelle
handcrafted jewelry of gemstone and clay
Contact via Facebook


Individual GIAW 2018 Supporters
Thank you greatly for your generosity and support!


✭ Tresyang D.
in memoriam of Lucila 

✭ Max R., Intact Australia

✭ Brian B., Intact Connecticut

✭ Michael Vier
"Thank you for all your hard work! If I were closer to D.C. I would be there."

✭ Janet M. - provided one of the traveling billboards for GIAW and beyond

✭ Amy E. - provided one of the traveling billboards for GIAW and beyond
"I wish I could attend these events! Maybe in the future.
Until then, may this sign go in my place.♥ "

✭ Ashley M.

✭ Daniel A.

✭ Robert J.

✭ Rodney D.

✭ Jennifer & Drew C., Intact Maryland

✭ Christina H., Intact Virginia

✭ Anu M., Intact Pennsylvania

✭ Michael M., Intact New Hampshire

✭ Eric S. and Holly M., Intact Houston

✭ David G.

✭ Jamie B., Intact Alabama

✭ Brittany W., Intact Nebraska

✭ Nancy J., Intact New Mexico

✭ Janice W.

✭ Leslie R.

✭ Alissa L.

✭ Cheryl S.

✭ James W.

✭ Ginger M.

✭ Melissa M.

✭ Rebekah J.

✭ Melissa D., Intact Michigan

✭ Danelle D., Intact Virginia

✭ Michelle M., Intact Rhode Island

✭ Teresa W.

✭ Austin H.

✭ Brian T.

✭ Melissa L.

✭ Cynthia M.

✭ Natalie W., Knoxville Wildtree | Facebook

✭ Danielle J., Intact Indiana

✭ Elana J., Intact Nebraska

✭ Mary L.

✭ Wren E.

✭ Jennifer R.

✭ Bret F. - provided all of Wednesday's #i2 GIAW Flags

✭ Samantha P. and Bill W. - provided all of Thursday's #i2 GIAW Flags

✭ Brittany W., Intact Nebraska - provided all of Friday's #i2 GIAW Flags

✭ Robbie J. & Holly M, Intact Houston - provided all of Saturday's #i2 GIAW Flags

✭ Maram H. & Robert B.- provided all of the GIAW MARCH flags needed for the Capitol to the White House!

✭ Robert J. - provided all of Sunday's #i2 GIAW Flags
"Let's make being intact the American Way!" -Robert

✭ Vivi M., Intact Cleveland - provided all of Monday's #i2 GIAW Flags

✭ Samantha A. - provided all of Tuesday's #i2 GIAW Flags





Allocation of GIAW 2018 Funds
(materials can only be ordered in the quantities we have funding for by March 28 - please help us reach our needed goal!) 

$800 new signage that will continue to be used throughout the year for rallies, expos, events, and future GIAW dates. We especially need a few of these to be new signs for kids to hold as ours are several years old and we have approximately 24 children attending GIAW with their families for most of the week this year. Children love to participate alongside their parents. 

$800 printed materials to give away at GIAW 2018. This week-long event functions as an expo, with booths of items that are entirely free for the public, meeting with people across the West Lawn from sun-up to sun-down each day for 7 days. Having enough professional literature on hand is crucial to GIAW's success. 

$300 Easter egg hunt on the West Lawn for children - we would like to ensure all children visiting the US Capitol can participate and that there will be enough to go around; we will also have child-sized advocacy bracelets, and a variety of #i2 themed stickers for children (Pokemon, Wonder Woman, and Intactosaurus). 

$200 flags for passing out along the march route, and giving away at the White House. Each flag will have intact information attached to it. These are *very* popular in DC and frequently chaperone groups who will not allow students to take other materials from GIAW leaders will allow them to accept and take home flags (getting intact material into their hands). 

$600 bracelets and buttons to give away throughout the week. These items are key in that they are the most requested items, especially by students - tomorrow's parents. We need materials that young people desire to hold onto, take home with them, and spark interest enough to check out the websites/share with friends. Awareness is key!

$60 two new full-color, full-page books of intact celebrities - one for the men's health booth, and one for the front West Wall of the Capitol where the most conversations take place.

$40 replacement plastibell, gomco, and mogen clamps for educational use (previously taken from an expo booth) 

$200 demonstration glans/foreskin models (in two skin shades) to highlight the normal adhesion of the foreskin to the glans/shaft in infancy, and the probing, severing, and cutting that must take place for infant circumcision to be achieved. These models are highly useful in one-on-one or small group education at expo booths.

If GIAW funds are raised beyond those needed, we will have intact material packs available to go home with people (U.S. advocates, leaders, teachers, and the international educators who visit the Capitol during GIAW and often ask for things to take back with them).  





Lanyard Options to Select From:
• Royal Blue: Genital Autonomy is a Human Right
• Violet: All Babies are Born Perfect
• Hot Pink: Foreskin is Fun & Functional
• Deep Aqua Blue: Boys are Not Born Broken

GIAW 2018 Buttons





*******

Words of Wisdom and Encouragement


"If for a while the harder you try, the harder it gets, take heart; so it has been with the best people who have ever lived." -Jeffrey R. Holland 

Be brave, my heart. <3 Have courage, my soul.

If you feel you don't fit in, in this world, it's because you're here to build a better one.

"Even after all this time, the sun never says to the earth, 'You owe me.'
Look what happens with a love like that - it lights the whole sky." -Hafiz, The Gift

May you always see the light, even in the darkness.

Surround yourself with people who love you for being you.

May the voices that cheer you on, always be louder than those that don't.

Wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it.
Right is right, even if only YOU are doing it.

Today, a caterpillar. Tomorrow, a butterfly.
Don't lose hope. You never know what tomorrow will bring.

"Let them judge you. Let them misunderstand you. Let them gossip about you. Their opinions aren't your problem. You stay kind, committed to LOVE, and free in your authenticity. No matter what they do or say, don't you dare doubt your worth or the beauty of your truth. Just keep on SHINING like you do." -Scott Stabile

"Hate has caused a lot of problems in this world, but it has not solved one yet." -Maya Angelou

"The coolest people I've ever met have the most colorful pasts. They've lived lives of risk, made bad choices, learned lessons, explored, and they're not afraid of being real. Tattered tapestries woven of similar threads, they're my kind of people - my favorite shades of crazy." -Stephen L. Lizotte

Self-help
How to stop time: kiss.
How to travel in time: read.
How to escape time: music.
How to feel time: write.
How to release time: breathe.

What's the greatest lesson a woman should learn? That since Day One she's already had everything she needs within herself. It's the world that convinced her she did not. -Rupi Kaur

Everyone wants to be the sun to lighten up someone's life; but why not be the moon to brighten in the darkest hour...

Now and then it's good to pause in our pursuit of happiness and just be happy.

"The best thing you can do as a father is make sure they see how you love their mother." -Matthew McConaughey

Sometimes it's okay if the only thing you did today was breathe.

People inspire you or they drain you. Pick them wisely. -Hans F. Hansen











Loveness in the Brokenness

By Kathleen Fleming, Majestic Unicorn



This was my hallway last Wednesday.

Broken. Sharp. Treacherous.

This was my hallway. It was my son who did this.

Sometimes, often really, things break - irreparably. And it takes your breath away...straight away. It took my breath away when my son stormed into the bathroom, frustrated, angry, fed-up for his very own, very significant to him, reasons. And when he chose to SLAM the bathroom door, causing the heavy mirror mounted to the front to slip out of the hardware holding it in place and crash onto the floor - a million, BROKEN pieces were left reflecting the afternoon light.

I was quiet.

I surveyed the damage and took a deep breath.

Put the dog outside so he wouldn't cut his feet, put the cat in the basement for the same reason.

I walked into the backyard and felt the hot tears streaming down my face. It's amazing how alone you can feel as a single parent in moments like these. I realized how scared and disappointed I felt. Did this really just happen? Yes. This was real. And as I stood and considered whether or not this was an indication of his developing character, I heard his tears through the window above me, coming from inside the bathroom. His soul hurt. This was not what he expected either. Hello, Anger - I don't remember inviting you into my house. Scary. Terrified. Ashamed. Worried. Scared.

Deep breath, #MamaWarrior. Deep breath.

That small, fragile soul needs you right now. He needs your very best. Your biggest compassion. Your most gentle and firm mama love and reassurance. More deep breaths. Go Mama. Go. Go now. Go open the front door, tiptoe through the broken glass, hear him hearing you coming, watch the bathroom door crack open, see the face you love most in the world red with worry and wet with tears, his voice is suddenly so small: "Mama, I'll never do it again, I am SO sorry." More tears. More weeping. Such uncertainty on his sweet face.

Go Mama. Get him. Go now. Scoop him into your lap. Yup, you're crying too. Damn this was big. Hold him tight. Watch how he curls into a ball in your arms so quickly. See how eager he is to be loved by you. To be reassured by you. See how small he still is. See how fragile that spirit is.

I love you.
You are safe.
I am right here.

The worst part is over now. I've got you. I'm here. I love you. Go Mama. Tell him about Anger. Tell him now. Anger is a really powerful feeling. You have a right to your Anger. Anger burns hot. It can purify. It can also destroy. He nods. He feels it. He's met Anger now. There's a better way to show your big feelings. We'll work on it together...tomorrow.

I'm here to help you. You are safe. You are never alone in your anger. You are never alone in your fears. I'm here. We're here together.

Now we will clean together.

And we cleaned up the broken pieces. We swept and we vacuumed. It was quiet work. It was careful work. It was thoughtful work.

Sometimes things break. Sometimes we break them. It's not the breaking that matters, the how or why. What matters is how we choose to respond to the broken-ness. Does it kill us? Does it throw us into a downward spiral of blame and punishment? OR does it help us remember how to love deepest? Does it push us towards compassion and over the hurdle of "rightness" and "wrongness" into LOVENESS? Yes. LOVENESS.

Go Mama. Go now. Get that baby of yours. Teach that. Show that. Live that. It's called LOVENESS. Go. Now.

Mother Love by Lulu, United Arab Emirates | Find more art by Lulu at Deviant Art


Related Reading: 

About the author.
Read more from Fleming at Majestic Unicorn and find her on Facebook here.

Tackling Distress Tantrums with Brain Research
DrMomma.org/2010/01/tackling-distress-tantrums-with-brain.html

When Things Get Physical: Hitting, Throwing, Kicking, Biting
DrMomma.org/2013/11/when-things-get-physical-hitting.html

Love Matters
DrMomma.org/2018/02/love-matters.html

Why Spanking is Never Okay
DrMomma.org/2010/09/why-spanking-is-never-okay.html

Peaceful Parenting Group
FB.com/groups/ExplorePeacefulParenting




Love, that is to nurse


No safer place in the world,
No better place to rest.
No calmer harbour can be found,
Than that of Mother’s breast.

No poetry brings it justice,
No rhyme or ancient verse.
One word only can love describe,
Love, that is to nurse. 💛

via PD Photography
MUA: @theminkzbox
Tribal Art: @kustom_stuff

The Breastfeeding Group




When Pink Was For Boys, Blue For Girls, Dresses for All

By Jeanne Maglaty for Smithsonian
Read More at SmithsonianMag.com
At Peaceful Parenting with permission.

Franklin D. Roosevelt in pastel pink and white, New York, 1884. 
Common dress and appearance for young boys at this time in U.S. history.

Little Franklin Delano Roosevelt sits primly on a stool, his white skirt spread smoothly over his lap, his hands clasping a hat trimmed with a marabou feather. Shoulder-length hair and patent leather party shoes complete the ensemble. Some may find the look unsettling today, yet social convention of 1884, when FDR was photographed at age 2 1/2, dictated that boys wore dresses until age 6 or 7, also the time of their first haircut.

Franklin’s outfit was considered gender-neutral. But nowadays "people just have to know the sex of a baby or young child at first glance," says Jo B. Paoletti, a historian at the University of Maryland and author of Pink and Blue: Telling the Girls From the Boys in AmericaThus we see, for example, a pink headband encircling the bald head of an infant girl. Why have young children’s clothing styles changed so dramatically? How did we end up with two “teams”—boys in blue and girls in pink?

Young boy, 1870

“It’s really a story of what happened to neutral clothing,” says Paoletti, who has explored the meaning of children’s clothing for 30 years. For centuries, she says, all children wore dainty white dresses up to age 6. “What was once a matter of practicality—you dress your baby in white dresses and diapers; white cotton can be bleached—became a matter of 'Oh my, if I dress my baby in the wrong thing, they’ll grow up perverted!'" Paoletti says.

The march toward gender-specific clothes was neither linear nor rapid. Pink and blue arrived, along with other pastels, as colors for babies in the mid-19th century, yet the two colors were not promoted as gender signifiers until just before World War I—and even then, it took time for popular culture to sort things out. For example, a June 1918 article from the trade publication Earnshaw’s Infants’ Department stated, "The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls. The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl." Other sources said blue was flattering for blonds, pink for brunettes; or blue was for blue-eyed babies, pink for brown-eyed babies, according to Paoletti.

Young boy, late 1800s

In 1927, Time magazine printed a chart showing sex-appropriate colors for girls and boys according to leading U.S. stores. In Boston, Filene’s told parents to dress boys in pink. So did Best & Co. in New York City, Halle’s in Cleveland, and Marshall Field in Chicago. Today’s color dictate wasn’t established until the 1940s, as a result of Americans’ preferences as interpreted by manufacturers and retailers. “It could have gone the other way,” Paoletti says. So the baby boomers were raised in gender-specific clothing. Boys dressed like their fathers, girls like their mothers. Girls had to wear dresses to school, though unadorned styles and tomboy play clothes were acceptable.

When the women’s liberation movement kicked things up in the mid-1960s, a more unisex look became the rage—but completely reversed from the time of young Franklin Roosevelt. Now young girls were dressing in masculine—or at least stereotypic 'unfeminine'—styles, devoid of gender hints. Paoletti found that in the 1970s, the Sears, Roebuck catalog pictured no pink toddler clothing for two years. "One of the ways [activists at the time] thought that girls were kind of lured into subservient roles as women was through gendered clothing," says Paoletti. "If we dress our girls more like boys and less like frilly little girls . . . they are going to have more options and feel freer to be active."

1960s blue romper patterns marketed for girls and boys

John Money, a sexual identity researcher at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, argued that gender was primarily learned through social and environmental cues. "This was one of the drivers back in the ’70s of the argument that it’s 'nurture not nature,'" Paoletti says. Gender-neutral clothing remained popular until about 1985. Paoletti remembers that year distinctly because it was between the births of her children, a girl in ’82 and a boy in ’86. "All of a sudden it wasn’t just a blue overall; it was a blue overall with a teddy bear holding a football," she says. Disposable diapers were manufactured in pink and blue.

Prenatal testing was a big reason for the change. Expectant parents learned the sex of their unborn baby and then went shopping for “girl” or “boy” merchandise. (“The more you individualize clothing, the more you can sell,” Paoletti says.) The pink fad spread from sleepers and crib sheets to big-ticket items such as strollers, car seats and riding toys. Affluent parents could conceivably decorate for baby No. 1, a girl, and start all over when the next child was a boy. More money is spent! Some young mothers who grew up in the 1980s deprived of pinks, lace, long hair and Barbies, Paoletti suggests, rejected the unisex look for their own daughters. “Even if they are still activists, they are perceiving those things in a different light than the baby boomer feminists did,” she says. “They think even if they want their girl to be a surgeon, there’s nothing wrong if she is a very feminine surgeon.”

Future King of Great Britain, George IV, 1896

Another important factor has been the rise of consumerism among children in recent decades. According to child development experts, children are just becoming conscious of their gender between ages 3 and 4, and they do not realize it’s permanent until age 6 or 7. At the same time, however, they are the subjects of sophisticated and pervasive advertising that tends to reinforce social conventions. “So they think, for example, that what makes someone female is having long hair and a dress,’’ says Paoletti. “They are so interested—and they are so adamant in their likes and dislikes.”

In researching and writing her book, Paoletti says, she kept thinking about the parents of children who don’t conform to gender roles: Should they dress their children to conform, or allow them to express themselves in their dress? “One thing I can say now is that I’m not real keen on the gender binary—the idea that you have very masculine and very feminine things. The loss of neutral clothing is something that people should think more about. And there is a growing demand for neutral clothing for babies and toddlers now, too.” “There is a whole community out there of parents and kids who are struggling with ‘My son really doesn’t want to wear boy clothes, prefers to wear girl clothes.’ ” She hopes one audience for her book will be people who study gender clinically. The fashion world may have divided children into pink and blue, but in the world of real individuals, not all is black and white.

Clarence Lacy Wise (b. April 16, 1892), son of Allen and Elnora Wise.
Donated to the Pendleton Historical Museum by Grace Bell.

Related:

Why Little Boys Wore Dresses
The Surprisingly Recent Time When Boys Wore Pink, Girls Wore Blue, and Both Wore Dresses
Pink and Blue: Telling the Girls from the Boys in America



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