The Last Time




The Last Time

From the moment you hold your baby in your arms,
You will never be the same.

You might long for the person you were before,
When you had freedom and time,
And nothing in particular to worry about.

You will know tiredness like you never knew it before,
And days will run into days that are exactly the same,
Full of feeding and burping,
Whining and fighting,
Naps, or lack of naps.

It might seem like a never-ending cycle.

But don't forget...

There is a last time for everything.

There will come a time when you will feed your baby for the very last time.

They will fall asleep on you after a long day
And it will be the last time you ever hold your sleeping child.

One day you will carry them on your hip, then set them down,
And never pick them up that way again.

You will scrub their hair in the bath one night 
And from that day on they will want to bathe alone.

They will hold your hand to cross the road,
Then never reach for it again.

They will creep into your room at midnight for cuddles,
And it will be the last night you ever wake for this.

One afternoon you will sing 'the wheels on the bus' and do all the actions,
Then you'll never sing that song again.

They will kiss you goodbye at the school gate,
The next day they will ask to walk to the gate alone.

You will read a final bedtime story, and wipe your last dirty face.

They will one day run to you with arms raised, for the very last time.

The thing is, you won't even know it's the last time until there are no more times,
And even then, it will take you a while to realize.

So while you are living in these times,
Remember there are only so many of them,
And when they are gone,
You will yearn for just one more day of them -
For one last time.

Author Unknown


Mama, You Are Home To Me




Dear Mama,

Could you wake up for a minute? I know it's hard for you to open your eyes - we haven't slept a lot yet tonight. But Mama, I kinda need you right now. You see, the thing is, I feel a bit lonely at the moment. I'm laying here and I'm somewhat cold.

I didn't mean to cry so I'm sorry I did. I've been trying to get your attention by making some noises for a while now but you were in such a deep sleep, you couldn't hear me. I don't know how else to get your attention. During the day, I see and hear you all make noises and I see you respond well to each other. You talk to me like that too. And I try very hard but I don't know how to do that yet. So I cry so you'd listen to me.

Mama, I'm sorry for crying. Like I said, I feel a bit lonely. I just spent nine months inside your belly where I've always felt safe. It's a bit scary to me to be in such a big bed all by myself. I miss your heartbeat, the rushing of your blood, the warmth and the food. I miss your breathing and your hands you put over me to protect me when I still was inside your belly.

So Mama, would you please listen to me? I'm calling for you in the only way I'm able to. I feel really alone. I need your warmth and your peace for a moment. I need to know for sure you're still here. So can I lay with you for a little while to feel your warmth?

Some cuddles first. Mama, this feels so nice. When I feel you holding me while you gently rock me and when I can smell and feel you, I feel so safe. I can feel your hand on my back and my ear is placed just right on your heart. Mom, this is home to me. Do you remember back when we were always together? I always felt like this back then. Sometimes I miss that time. It was so nice to be close to you.

I hear you softly whisper into my ear, "Everything is okay little one, everything is fine." Your voice is so soft and familiar. You smell good mom. A bit like me and a bit like you.

Mama, will you hold me just a little longer? I'm really tired and I feel so relaxed in your arms. It almost feels like before. I'm going to close my eyes for a little while, okay? Can I please stay with you here a little longer to enjoy your love and your presence?

And can I drink some more? Mama, since we're laying like this anyway... I'd like to ask you something. I know, it sounds pretty sad because I can't talk like you can yet so I'm sorry for crying again. But mama, can I please drink some more? My throat is dry and my tummy is empty and since we're here anyway... maybe I can have a few more sips? Your milk tastes delicious and is so warm and familiar.

Thanks Mom, that's exactly what I needed. I was really really thirsty. Your finger on my cheek feels great by the way. And you're smiling at me. Nothing makes me happier than seeing your smile and feeling your presence. I'll close my eyes again, okay? Please don't put me away straight away, I really enjoy falling asleep here. This feels really good. Can I stay with you?

My tummy hurts. What is that?! Mama! Can you feel this? Mom? My tummy hurts so bad. What is happening? Please help me mama, I don't know what's happening. I've never felt anything like this.

Thank you for rubbing my belly mom. It's late and everyone is asleep. I'm so happy you're here for me. I don't know what I'd do without you mama. My tummy already hurts less and when you hold me like that... I feel pretty tired. Maybe I'll close my eyes again. Please hold me a little longer?

Can I have more cuddles? You won't believe this mama! I'm a bit scared. I just woke up and I didn't know where I was for a second. It was all dark and a little cold again. I know you're tired mama. But I really missed you, can I please be with you again for a while?

Mama, I can see that you're tired. There are tears in your eyes, and every now and then a tear rolls down your cheek. I'm sorry Mama, but I feel really strange in this new world. I miss home. I miss always being close to you.


Sometimes I feel a tear fall on my head while you gently rock me. You're singing me a song so that I can go back to sleep. You softly dry the tears that fell on my head with your hand. That feels nice Mom, do that again?

I fall asleep on your chest. You feel so soft, so familiar. There's nowhere I sleep better than here. My legs are pulled up, just like they were back when I still lived with you. I can hear your heartbeat again and I move along with your breathing.

Mama, you're the best place to be. I'm so glad I get to come to you over and over again. I don't like being unable to just ask either but I'm really happy you listen to me when I call for you.

Soon, I'll be able to be there for you. Or for my brothers or sisters. Or for my friends in school. You're teaching me how to take care of someone. You're teaching me that you listen, even when I can't ask. You're teaching me I'm safe, even when sometimes it feels like I'm not. You're teaching me that you love me, even when you're very tired. Thank you.

And Mama, I love you.

{author unknown}




Your Baby's Signs of Hunger




This poster, created by the Women's and Newborn Services of Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, highlights a human baby's hunger cues - her way of communicating to parents that she needs to eat.

As highlighted in the 2010 article, 7 Breastfeeding Fact You Should Know, parents are reminded that stirring, mouth opening, turning a head (to seek a nipple) and rooting are signs that your baby is hungry. Stretching, becoming agitated, and sucking on her fist, fingers or thumb is your baby's way of telling you that she is really hungry. By the time fussing and crying start, your baby is experiencing hunger that is physically painful. It is the type of hunger you experience after your belly has been empty for 14-16 hours. Your baby's belly is very small - this is the reason she gets full so quickly, and then hungry again so soon. Her tiny stomach cannot handle more than this, and does not have any place to 'store' some for later. She is entirely dependent upon you to provide that fill-up according to her cues that she is hungry.

Too often new parents believe they should schedule feedings or wait until their baby cries to nurse. But crying is a late indicator of extreme hunger. Always eating when you are so famished, when your belly hurts and stress hormones from being anxious to eat are at an ultimate high, leads to things like reflux, gas, stomach aches, 'colic,' and general agitation and general withdrawal from the world around - especially if you are brand new and helpless in this world.

Don't wait until your baby is in pain to nurse. Instead, feed at the first cue of hunger, and everyone will be much healthier and happier all around.

For related reading, see the Breastfeeding Resource Page.


A little tiny tummy wisdom from Baby Wisdom (UK):

Size of a baby's stomach.
Day One - the size of a cherry
Day Three - the size of a radish
Week Two - the size of a large egg
Month Two - the size of an apricot

For this reason, babies need to eat small amounts very often throughout the day and night time hours. Watch your little one and his/her cues. Nursing on cue, around the clock, leads to a baseline level of health, development, and happiness for babies, and their parents.


*******

The 10 Most Important Things I've Learned Since Losing My Son

By Richard Pringle
Originally on Facebook
Also at The Mirror and Newsner



1. You can never, ever kiss and love too much.

2. You always have time. Stop what you’re doing and play, even if it’s just for a minute. Nothing is that important that it can’t wait.


3. Take as many photos and record as many videos as humanly possible. One day that might be all you have.

4. Don’t spend money, spend time. You think what you spend matters? It doesn’t. What you do matters. Jump in puddles, go for walks. Swim in the sea, build a camp, and have fun. That’s all they want. I can’t remember what we bought Hughie, I can only remember what we did.


5. Sing. Sing songs together. My happiest memories are of Hughie sitting on my shoulders or sitting next to me in the car singing our favorite songs. Memories are created in music.

6. Cherish the simplest of things. Night times, bedtimes, reading stories. Dinners together. Lazy Sundays. Cherish the simplest of times. They are what I miss the most. Don’t let those special times pass you by unnoticed.


7. Always kiss those you love goodbye, and if you forget, go back and kiss them. You never know if it’s the last time you’ll get the chance.

8. Make boring things fun. Shopping trips, car journeys, walking to the shops. Be silly, tell jokes, laugh, smile, and enjoy yourselves. They’re only chores if you treat them like that. Life is too short not to have fun.


9. Keep a journal. Write down everything your little ones do that lights up your world. The funny things they say, the cute things they do. We only started doing this after we lost Hughie. We wanted to remember everything. Now we do it for Hettie, and we will for Hennie too. You’ll have these memories written down forever, and when you're older you can look back and cherish every moment. 

10. If you have your children with you: To kiss goodnight. To have breakfast with. To walk to school. To take to university. To watch get married. You are blessed. Never ever forget that. ❤


End Note: Richard Pringle, of Hastings U.K., went through the most unimaginable pain a parent can know when his son, Hughie, passed away following a brain hemorrhage at age 3. One year after Hughie's death, Richard shared his list of the most important things he learned. It’s a list that everyone should read and take to heart. It is a reminder not to take our loved ones for granted.

*******

Mother Loses Baby to SIDS and Cautions Parents to Protect Their Own from Circumcision


The following is a letter to Saving Our Sons, the intact education branch of Peaceful Parenting:


I want to thank you for all you do in educating people about the cruel and unnecessary act of male genital mutilation. You work to open so many minds on this archaic process built on lies.

I recently lost my second son to SIDS at 24 days old. He was a beautiful healthy baby boy who tragically passed away in his sleep. The medical examiner found absolutely nothing wrong with him. He had an extensive autopsy, and all reports showed nothing wrong.

The hospital I birthed him at kept asking me over and over again if I was going to have him circumcised. Everytime my answer was a clear NO! A day later as I nursed my sweet, perfect baby boy, a nurse came into my room and said, "I am here to take him for his procedure."

I asked, "What procedure?"

She answered, "His circumcision."

I said, "He is NOT being circumcised."

She replied, "Well, he is on the board out in the nurse's station to be circumcised."

I said, "Absolutely not! I don't know who put him on that board but I have clearly stated over and over he is not to be circumcised."

She turned red in the face and apologized. She said someone must have made a mistake.

My point is that a parent has to be diligent in making sure that even though they say NO to genital cutting, that is not done 'by mistake.'

After losing my baby boy I realized that I had to speak up and say something. I am having a difficult time as it is, and if he had suffered that unimaginable pain in his short life I would never be able to live with myself. I just want to warn other mothers and fathers. Some parents send their babies to the nursery to get some rest, and if they take them to circumcise, then the parents would not know until it is too late.

One thing I take solace in is knowing my son never had to experience any suffering, including circumcision. If I had not questioned that nurse he would have been wheeled away to face mutilation that no baby boy deserves.

❤ Audrea


Awareness raising stickers and cards at Etsy

How to Choose the Best and Safest Infant Car Seat for Babies

From the time you got out of your hospital room with your newborn, you are required by law to have an infant car seat. Find out how to get the best one for you and your family.


Essential Things You Must Know Before Going On The Market For An Infant Safety Seat 

Finding the perfect infant car safety seat for your newborn is not an easy task, especially if you're a new parent. You can't help but get overwhelmed with so many choices available out there. There are also many factors you need to take into consideration including car seat laws.

Infant seats come in different types, from convertible car seats to lightweight and portable ones for smaller vehicles. Moreover, once your child is a toddler or older, you have another task of finding the right booster seat that also comes in several types including high-back and backless booster.

Car seats are not created equally. Knowing your requirements will help in choosing the right one for you and your baby. Reading reviews and articles online on top-rated infant safety seats such as Mother How TOP List can help you with your decisions as well.

What Is An Infant Safety Seat?

An Infant car seat is specially designed to cater to a child weighing up to 35 pounds. These seats are also always positioned facing the rear of your vehicles. It comes with several features that provide comfort for both you and your adorable newborn.

However, one of the main reasons why you need to get one is that car seat law across the country requires your infant to be in the rear-face mode until he or she have reached its height and weight limitations, which is typically by the age of two.

Today, there are convertible car seats you can buy with extended capacity for the rear-face mode and can grow with your child.

Difference Between Infant and Convertible Car Seats

Infant Safety Seat 

  • Its weight limit is up to 40 lbs. 
  • You can only use it on rear-face position. 
  • Majority of brands come with a handle making it easy to carry and transport. 
  • You will not disturb your baby's sleep when you're getting him in and out of your vehicles.


Convertible Car Seat 

  • Offers a weight range of up to 50 lbs. 
  • There are also some brands that offer a greater weight capacity. 
  • You can use it as rear-facing if your infant is smaller. 
  • You can use it as front-facing when your child is older and has reached the maximum limitations of the rear-face mode.


What You Need To Consider When On The Market For A Car Seat

Rest assured that all car safety seats you will find on the market today are obligated to satisfy the safety regulations and standards of the government. So keep in mind that a lower price tag does not necessarily mean that the seat is not as safe as those expensive ones. The difference lies in the extra features for more costly seats such as straightforward installation and additional safety measures not obligated by law.

Nevertheless, there are several things you need to take into consideration. Getting a car seat is just like purchasing a new vehicle wherein you have to see it as whole.


  • How it will fit your car. How it will fit your car. Make sure to select an infant car seat that correctly fits your car. You also need to consider how comfortable it will be to switch the seat from one car to another if you'll be using more than one vehicle. Choose a portable one if you have a smaller car.



  • Buying second hand. If you're on a tight budget, you may be considering getting a used seat. But it may have some damage to it not visible to the naked eye. Also, it may not be up to the current safety standards. If you can't afford a new one, make sure to buy from someone you truly trust. Furthermore, check its expiration date or if it has been recalled.



  • Cleaning. Babies can create a lot of mess. So when shopping for an infant seat, look for one with a removable and machine washable cover. Comfort. A crying infant on a long road trip is a headache waiting to happen. Choose a padded seat that offers enough head support to keep your baby comfortable no matter how long or short the drive is.



  • Check for recalls. Your baby's safety should always be your top priority. Always check if a brand or model is a part of a recall. You can check online or call the seat's manufacturer. The best way to know is by visiting the website of The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.


The Best Baby Infant Car Seat

When it comes to reliability and safety, the best choice out there is the Peg Perego ® - Primo Viaggio 4/35. This infant car seat packed with superb features to keep your infant safe and secure during the ride. It combines aesthetics and functionality as what you can expect from Peg Perego.

This rear-facing seat passed the government safety regulations and crash tests with flying colors. It also provides further protection to your infant by adding an anti-rebound bar to its base reducing the impact of both rear or front collision. For side impact protection, it comes with head support and energy-absorbing foam. You can also recline it on different angles so your baby will be very safe and comfortable.

However, it does come with some drawbacks. You cannot wash the seat's Italian-made cushion in the washing machine. Also, the anti-rebound bar is not adjustable, so it may not be suitable on some vehicles. Overall, its extra safety features and durability makes up for some of its shortcomings.

Pros


  • Easy-to-install base with LATCH connectors. 
  • Designed with your baby's comfort and safety in mind. 
  • You can use it easily when traveling without the seat's base. 
  • Offers additional protection in the event of a crash. 
  • Comes with a two-year warranty.


Cons


  • Not many stroller brands are compatible with it. 
  • The cushion is not machine washable. 
  • You may find the handle a little bit uncomfortable when extending the canopy.


Related Facebook Group for Q&A: CarSeats



Why You Need To Give Your Kids A Tech-Free Holiday


Although it sometimes seems like a million years ago, I vividly remember what it was like to be a kid. As a child of the 80s, my youth wasn’t spent living up to the unrealistic expectations that social media places upon us or being glued to electronic devices. I have fond memories of countless hours spent outdoors, playing with my neighborhood friends until the streetlights illuminated at dusk, signifying to us that it was time to run along home.

I am eternally grateful to not to have had to spend my early years in a time that was consumed by technology and all things social media. I secretly wish I could offer my children this same luxury that was awarded to me as a means to keep them safe, and allow them an opportunity to grow up in a time when their self-worth didn’t rely on a “like” from a stranger or reaching that next level in a silly game. Sadly, many children today are codependent on electronics, and their parents overindulge them with tech gadgets in place of parenting.

Being a parent in this day and age is hard, but what’s harder is being a child in a time when social media and technology in general have so much control over a person’s day to day life. Our role as a parent is often to shield our child from dangers, but to teach them limits and to know when “enough is enough” for things that should be practiced in moderation.

Think you could put yourself on pause from all things tech for 2-3 weeks? Here’s why you should do it for your kids--and yourself--when possible.

Give Your Littles a Chance to Recharge Their Brain And Rest Those Tired Eyes

Staring at LED screens isn’t good for our eyes, and the same can be said for our little ones. With the explosion of handheld devices in the past decade, opthamologists are seeing a steady increase in vision impairments in young children. Breaks from screen time are vital, and a tech-free holiday can essentially be just what the doctor ordered for your children and their precious eyes. Also, encourage your child to use their endless imagination when it comes to playtime. Their budding brain will thank them--and you!

Real Quality Time Together as a Family

We all know that we’ve been guilty of being together but not actually being present. When we’re glued to electronics we aren’t giving others our undivided attention. Put those phones, tablets and game consoles aside and focus on what’s really important when you’re with the people that you love the most, each other! Another simple trick to implement even when you’re not on a designated tech holiday? Always keep those electronics tucked away during family meal time. Breaking bread with those you love should be a cherished time and a chance to catch up on the day and get to know those people you adore even more.

Keep Your Kids Safe From Those Hidden Dangers Lurking on the Internet

For any parent, our biggest fear is something terrible happening to our child. Life is truly unpredictable, but there are certain precautionary measures that we can implement to keep our kids safe. The very first step towards protecting your kids from online predators is to start a dialogue on the topic so that they can become aware. Teach your kids that they should never, ever for any reason give out personal information about themselves to a stranger on the internet. The internet is a scary place for a parent of an impressionable youth, and we must always keep that in mind. There are even websites openly selling Fake IDs - and Fake ID reviews websites too. Go a step beyond that initial chat by implementing parental controls and limiting their screen time, along with monitoring their online activity. When it comes to our kids, we can never be too safe.

Think you’re ready to the challenge and start your tech-free holiday? Make a pact to stick to it together and accept the challenge for yourselves. We promise you won’t regret it, and we assure that it is possible. Start with a weekend, and you’ll be pleasantly surprised to see how quickly the real time spent together goes by.


Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood & The Tree of Life Congregation


💔 Let's love each other along life's journey.

The Tree of Life congregation is located in Mr. Fred Rogers’ neighborhood. Mr. Rogers once told the world, "When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the HELPERS. You will always find people who are helping.'"

Artist of the piece above, Sasha Phillips, adds, "This is one of those times that looking is not enough - you have to BE one of those HELPERS, in every way you can - by stopping hateful speech in its tracks, by voting, by being heard, by reaching out to support those who are being persecuted. You have to do this with light and love in your heart. Because 'the only thing evil can’t stand is forgiveness.' Wish we paid more attention to Mr. Rogers."



Related Reading 

• Healing power of art inspires Pittsburgh lawyer's Mister Rogers drawing: http://www.post-gazette.com/local/neighborhood/2018/10/30/Mister-Rogers-Pittsburgh-lawyer-art-synagogue-shootings-Tree-Life/stories/201810300132

• After Pittsburgh shooting in Mr. Rogers' real-life neighborhood, Squirrel Hill neighbors follow his lead: https://abcnews.go.com/US/pittsburgh-shooting-mr-rogers-real-life-neighborhood-squirrel/story?id=58849272

• Mister Rogers' Neighborhood on PBS: https://pbskids.org/video/mister-rogers/1421146807

• Won't You Be My Neighbor (2018 Documentary) on Amazon

• Artwork by Sasha Phillips: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10218143154789258&set=a.10201884967024725


Benefits of Babywearing Beyond Babyhood

By Danelle Day © 2018



When we think 'babywearing' the picture that often comes to mind is the snuggly, squishy goodness of a band new baby cuddled gently near the heart of a parent. Babywearing makes a world of difference in the lives of new parents, and has monumental benefits for infants beginning at birth (everything from increasing calm alertness, improving sleep and digestion, enhancing neurological and physical development, to regulating body temperature, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and more). Humans belong to the classification of 'carry mammals.' Part of being a carry mammal means that babies are born with several reflexes (the grasp reflex, spread-squat reflex, and the Moro reflex) to hold tight to a parent and be carried in baby's natural habitat - the adult chest. This close, physical contact for much of the day supports a baby's brain development that occurs most rapidly in the first 36 months of life, and keeps undeveloped systems (breathing, heart rate, temperature, etc.) regulated close to a parent's chest. Babies truly are born to be worn. Babywearing in these initial years is ubiquitous across the globe. But one babywearing topic we don't discuss as frequently includes the benefits and joys of wearing beyond the early baby days.

Over a decade ago, my first son was rapidly outgrowing carriers available, at the same time that Kinderpacks were just starting to take shape one state over. He was an extremely sensitive child who loved to explore the world around us, but always needed to be close to a parent to feel secure. We enjoyed having him up at eye level where we could easily talk quietly with him, and where he was engaged with conversations around us as an active participant, rather than a passive babe stuck in a stroller at our knees. He was able to see, hear, touch, experience all that we were, and safely. Wearing him met his needs perfectly. However, as he soared "off the charts" in height and weight for his age, babywearing became increasingly impossible. The Preschool Kinderpack had yet to be born, and we regretfully had to give up babywearing entirely too early, with no affordable option for a child his size.

Several years later I befriended a family planning to adopt a special needs child. They were avid hikers, and through their treks back and forth to be with this child, I saw their love for her grow, and knew they would need a way to fully include her in their outdoor adventures. I went on a search to see if things had changed in the babywearing world, and fell immediately in love with the Toddler and Preschool Kinderpacks. Because Kinderpacks were difficult to "score" at the time, I set out to raise funds to purchase one second hand from another individual, and it ended up being worth every penny. This sweet child, somewhat timid and fearful, came to live in her new home and find peace in the closeness and bonding that occurs being cozy in a pack next a protective, loving adult. Her mom told me that she would ask for "up" each morning while they did farm chores, and she was able to venture out to see her new world, safe and secure on her dad's back. If ONE simple Kinderpack could have this much positive impact on the life of a child, how much more good could I do sharing them further? It was a question that begged an active, involved response.

Since that time I've had another baby who rapidly grew "off the charts" like his brother, and we have been blessed to try out Kinderpacks here and there that we fundraise to purchase before passing them onto new families in need. We've used them for everything from long day trips to the zoo, hikes in the mountains and along the beach, singing together with this sweet little voice in my ear, taking an older sibling to the dentist, scurrying through airport terminals when I must travel alone with two kids, and having him ride along for work projects when there's otherwise no good spot for a preschooler year old to hang out. As a homeschooling, active duty military family of 17 years, I'm frequently in a situation of balancing solo-parenting with striving to maintain "normal" life at home. Childwearing calms tired little ones, allows for bigger adventures and longer days with older kids, keeps everyone safe, decreases anxieties when Dad is deployed once again, increases the reconnection when he is home, and makes the errands, appointments, and work requirements of life in general more kid-friendly on a day to day basis. I cannot count the ways that our lives are better now because of easy access to preschool carriers.


At this age, little ones are just beginning to move away from their babyhood years (the first ~36 months) into early childhood. Babywearing during this time offers mental, emotional, and physical support for a child to progress through this transition in his/her own perfect timing. Developmental research has shown time and again that when stress is decreased for a child, when a little one feels safe, secure, and close to a loving adult, they are able to observe more, learn more readily, and develop optimally, growing in their individual self-confidence and self-sureness in the world around them at their own perfect pace.

A research nerd myself, I am enamored with data on secure attachment, neurological development, and how babywearing throughout baby, toddler, and the preschool years fits in with this. However, I've found it equally compelling to listen to families who have walked these paths before, and share their qualitative experiences. I've had the honor of meeting with with countless families from all demographics through the non-profit educational work of Peaceful Parenting, and know for certain that preschool babywearing makes a BIG difference in the lives of so many, regardless of their family background. Below are some of the experiences parents have shared with me that are worth considering for the happiness and health of our children.


For Sibling Relationships

"Babywearing has been such a blessing in my life. My older son has anxiety, and when he was preschool aged, he had a difficult time in stores or other crowded places. Babywearing truly saved us all a lot of stress during those times. He was able to be close to me or his father while also participating calmly in our family shopping trips. I'm positive that babywearing helped him develop into the confident little boy he is today. All the times I have tandem wore my kiddos has also had a big impact on them as siblings. It really seems to help with bonding, and avoid jealousy between them." -Michelle

Eszter and her little one

For Travel

"My husband and I are so grateful to have been able to wear our son for all of his 3.5 years. If he's being worn, he's safe, he's close, and he can see what we see and participate! We recently adopted a large 'puppy' who needs and adores walks. Babywearing makes these walks (especially while parenting solo) a breeze! Not to mention the many times scooting through the airport - everywhere I've been, you don't need to remove your child through security, you can go as fast as you need, and your hands are free (once again, especially during solo parenting). Babywearing is just so much more convenient than a stroller!" -Krista

Krista's little one

For Close Connection

"Babywearing an older child has helped to not only strengthen the bond that I have with my little one, but has also strengthened his trust that I will always be there for him when he is independently exploring the world. It is amazing to see how this experience has helped to develop my child's adventurous spirit -- always ready to take on what wonders the world has to offer, but knowing there is a safe spot back on my back when it's needed." -Anu

"Wearing beyond babyhood has helped me because even preschoolers get tired and need a boost sometimes. But I think more importantly, young children still have a need to be close to parents to help them feel secure and help them deal with sometimes overwhelming emotions." -Megan

"I wore all 3 of my big kids into childhood. I think it only increased our bond and their security. Even now, if my youngest is sad, he'll get our carrier and either just snuggle it or put it on himself. It makes him feel connection, even if I'm not wearing him in it, it seems to represent security to him." -Jami

For Military Families

"I was at sea the majority of our son's early years, and preschool babywearing has allowed for this father-son bond now when we go to the aquarium, the zoo, on hikes, or even visit base, that I cannot see happening otherwise." -Adam

Post-Surgical Healing Time

"Preschool babywearing was very helpful for my second son after surgery when he was 5. We also utilize the carrier often because our current 5 year old has anxiety outside and in groups." -Natalie

John and his little one

To Explore More!

"I love being able to go explore and experience things but have a comfortable and easy way for my daughter to be carried when her legs are tired. It also keeps her safe in the fact that she has severe food allergies that she is very contact reactive to. So when we are in a tricky scenario it's nice to have a safe option for her." -Kindra

"Wearing our 3.5 year old let's us go on bigger adventures!" -Janna

Janna and her little one

For Parents and Children with Unique Needs

"Childwearing has massively helped us. I'm deaf, and I can see my child talking to me from my carrier with mirrors. It helps to calm us both down if there has been any kind of stressful or sad situation and it keeps our connections going!" -Rosie (who writes more on this topic at Carrying Matters UK)

"My 5 year old cannot walk due to CP. We love backpacking! With preschool babywearing, we can make quick trips without hauling out her wheelchair, and we can still enjoy family hikes and outdoor adventures. We also bring the pack along for long walks when our 3 year old gets tired." -Lillie

Rosie and her little one

For Father/Child Bonding

"I'm a dad. I love my boys. I carried my now 14 year old. He carries my now 2 year old. My 2 year old mimics and carries a doll. I would say that it has bonded all of us and helped my boys be empathic and nurturing to their siblings. I feel like we must be doing something right with how much they care for each other." -Ryan

For Sensitive Children 

"My son is sensitive and often uncomfortable in new or social situations. Our Kinderpack is his home away from home. When he is in the carrier we are one and he is at ease. With preschool wearing we are able to experience the world together." -Christina

"My huge 3 year old has PANS and 'uppies' help so much with sensory issues and just getting out on tough days." -Sydney

"Our child is high needs, especially in public, and babywearing helps to prevent meltdowns since he is still learning executive skills and emotional stability." -Faith

To Decrease Over-Stimulation

"Our son was so anxious around people that being worn gave him the safety he needed to be social on his terms. It also kept him safe and close once he became sure of himself..." -Brandi

"I have a five year old who is almost turning six. He only weighs 36 pounds and I wear him in a preschool carrier. It has helped in times where we are in crowds and he’s overstimulated, or places where I’d like to walk further and longer than he can. Mostly it’s a space for him to retreat to when tired or overwhelmed. Nothing like those hugs from my back while I walk around!" -Sarah

To Get Errands Done (Safely/Quickly)

"I can do my shopping while my 3 year old naps. I've also done construction, farm animal care, hiking, and fixed my car without having to keep an eye on him thanks to babywearing." -Moira

"I love wearing my preschooler! My kid-wearing has become less and less frequent over the last two years, but when I do wear her it feels so cuddly and special. I still love it so much even though she is getting bigger. I'm so thankful for my Preschool Kinderpack that allows us to continue wearing whenever she wants a ride or needs to be close to me." -Jennifer

"My 3.5 yr old likes being worn when he first wakes up. It’s also saved us many times in stores!" -Bekah

Involving Littles in Conversation

"I wore my oldest until age 4 (had to stop due to a car accident/neck injury). I think it made us super close. She was always content, and her language skills developed super early, I believe from always being at face level and in the conversation with me and other adults." -Jada


For the Solo Parenting Mom or Dad

"As a single mom - you do what you gotta do!" -Kelly, while simultaneously preschool babywearing and carrying her youngest

For a Better View of the World Around Us

"Sometimes people give me a funny look for preschool wearing, but I see those same people carrying their preschoolers around in their arms, on their backs and on their shoulders. I’d rather save my arms. Also love that babywearing lifts him up higher, so he’s not stuck in a crowd at hip level. People are made to see and respond to faces. That’s not exactly where a preschooler’s line of sight is in a crowd, and it’s overwhelming for them. I was in Disney last week with him and got down at his level in a crowd and really noticed it—it’s a sea of back pockets and zippers, not people. A good carrier lifts them and lets them see and recognize faces and be part of the crowd, or hide their face against their grown up to reduce stimulus. I know our last days of wearing is coming soon. It’s very infrequent now, and he’s almost six—though still very small for his age. Leaving child wearing behind will be bittersweet." -Sarah

"Our almost 3 year old could never see the exhibits at the zoo from her stroller because of all the adults, so I put her on my back. We also wore her to a local Celtic Fest because of the crowd size." -Kim

To Keep Kids Safe

"My son loves to be independent and is a runner. Babywearing is a way for me to keep track of him and snuggle him at the same time. He often fights sleep in a stroller, but easily falls asleep on me. It’s great for helping him calm down when he’s frustrated or emotional. It helps when he’s tired of walking but still wants to see everything." -Nelisha

Preschool babywearing keeps little hands safe! "So they aren't touching/picking up everything they see. When my littles can see it all from a high view, and they're attached to me, they can't touch unless I move over to help them. It helps to deter tantrums from me having to remove them [from an unsafe situation] or hold them back." -Rosie

"Little legs get tired, but their sense of adventure doesn't! We love to take our daughters hiking or to explore places off the beaten map or places where strollers just are a hassle. They wanna see it all, but their legs get tuckered. Also it is easier for us to keep them safe near cliffs, ledges, or events with large crowds, and they don't feel restrained, but engaged and included." -Molly

"Preschool babywearing because this way I don’t lose my 4 year old in a public place!" -Blair

During Loss and Sadness 

"My kids lost their mom to cancer when our youngest was 4. I cannot imagine the added turmoil we would have faced without the Kinderpack you gave us. She had an incredibly tough time with everything, and this was the one thing I could keep the same for her, and to know I wouldn't leave her too, which was another fear. Thank you." -C.J.


For Easier Vacations with Kids

"Childwearing is especially helpful on vacations when walking a lot with tired little ones who want to be carried, or are overtired and need to sleep." -Brittany

"Preschool babywearing enables us to go on hikes all the time. It really allows us to go on actual hikes without it being a death march for her." -Arielle

Jennifer and her little one

For Multiple Options 

"Today I wore my 4.5 year old, while his 1 year old sister and 5 year old brother were pushed in the double stroller during homeschool days at the zoo -- switching it up keeps everyone happy (he was also SUPER MUDDY and shoeless!!)" -Megan

Jennifer said that having a carrier for an older child was her 'best toddler purchase ever.' "She is 4.5 years old (still nursing) and rode in the carrier while we were in New York on a trip. I was 4 months pregnant at the same time." -Jennifer

Megan and her little one

For Health Concerns

"Our 3.5 year old had juvenile interval fevers, so carrying was a great way of still continuing with school runs, etc., when she was feeling ill." -Emma

"I love being able to go explore and experience things, but have a comfortable and easy way for her to be carried when her legs are tired. It also keeps her safe in the fact that she has severe food allergies that she is very contact reactive to. So when we are in a tricky scenario it's nice to have a safe option for her." -Kindra

"My wife had an injury when our first was little and being in a wheelchair allowed her to see things from a different vantage point. We both realized through that experience that we wanted our kids up at our eye level, to be really included in the conversations and to see the world up at a height with everyone else -- not sitting in a stroller staring at knees and street posts and rarely being fully engaged with talking adults. Childwearing changes the world experience for a little kid in big ways!" -John

For Emergencies 

"Our area was demolished with Hurricane Harvey but the flooding in our neighborhood, specifically, was not expected. What does this have to do with babywearing? My husband, myself, and my neighbor all left the area with rescue crews while we were wearing our preschoolers and toddler. It is something you never think about unless it happens to you, but being able to wear a child instead of trying to carry them in an emergency situation is monumentally beneficial. Since that time I think often about refugee families and I wish each one could have a carrier for their children when fleeing dangerous situations as well." -Heather

Katy and her little one

For Gentle Transition into Childhood

"Just today I was wearing my almost 4 year old because he wanted to snuggle me like his little brother does..." -Katy

"My 8-yr-old would still babywear if he could! At church when we're in song service, he'll ask me to carry him (it helps that he's a petite kid), press his cheek against mine, and we will sing together." -Melissa

No matter where your babywearing adventures take you, a sincere thank you for wearing your baby, your toddler, or your preschooler, and changing the world in positive ways - one little life at a time. ♥



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