Why African Babies Don't Cry

By J. Claire K. Niala
Read more from Niala at In Culture Parent


Why African Babies Don't Cry

I was born and grew up in Kenya and Cote d’Ivoire. From the age of fifteen I lived in the UK. However, I always knew that I wanted to raise my children (whenever I had them) at home in Kenya. And yes, I assumed I was going to have them. I am a modern African woman, with two university degrees, and a fourth generation working woman – but when it comes to children, I am typically African. The assumption remains that you are not complete without them; children are a blessing which would be crazy to avoid. Actually the question does not even arise.

I started my pregnancy in the UK. The urge to deliver at home was so strong that I sold my practice, setup a new business and moved house and country within five months of finding out I was pregnant. I did what most expectant mothers in the UK do – I read voraciously: Our Babies, Ourselves, Unconditional Parenting, anything by Sears – the list goes on. (My grandmother later commented that babies don’t read books and really all I needed to do was “read” my baby). Everything I read said that African babies cried less than European babies. I was intrigued as to why.

photo by Andy Graham

When I went home, I observed. I looked out for mothers and babies and they were everywhere, though very young African ones, under six weeks, were mainly at home. The first thing I noticed is that despite their ubiquitousness, it is actually quite difficult to actually “see” a Kenyan baby. They are usually incredibly well wrapped up before being carried or strapped onto their mother (sometimes father). Even older babies strapped onto a back are further protected from the elements by a large blanket. You would be lucky to catch sight of a limb, never mind an eye or nose. The wrapping is a womb-like replication. The babies are literally cocooned from the stresses of the outside world into which they are entering.

My second observation was a cultural one. In the UK, it was understood that babies cry. In Kenya, it was quite the opposite. The understanding is that babies don’t cry. If they do – something is horribly wrong and something must be done to rectify it immediately. My English sister-in-law summarized it well. “People here,” she said, “really don’t like babies crying, do they?”

It all made much more sense when I finally delivered and my grandmother came from the village to visit. As it happened, my baby did cry a fair amount. Exasperated and tired, I forgot everything I had ever read and sometimes joined in the crying too. Yet for my grandmother it was simple, “Nyonyo (breastfeed her)!” It was her answer to every single peep.

There were times when it was a wet nappy, or that I had put her down, or that she needed burping, but mainly she just wanted to be at the breast – it didn’t really matter whether she was feeding or just having a comfort moment. I was already wearing her most of the time and co-sleeping with her, so this was a natural extension to what we were doing.


I suddenly learned the not-so-difficult secret of the joyful silence of African babies. It was a simple needs-met symbiosis that required a total suspension of ideas of what should be happening and an embracing of what was actually going on in that moment. The bottom line was that my baby fed a lot – far more than I had ever read about and at least five times as much as some of the stricter feeding schedules I had seen.

At about four months, when a lot of urban mothers start to introduce solids as previous guidelines had recommended, my daughter returned to newborn-style hourly breastfeeding, which was a total shock. Over the past four months, the time between feeds had slowly started to increase. I had even started to treat the odd patient without my breasts leaking or my daughter’s nanny interrupting the session to let me know my daughter needed a feed.

Most of the mothers in my mother and baby group had duly started to introduce baby rice (to stretch the feeds) and all the professionals involved in our children’s lives – pediatricians, even doulas, said that this was ok. Mothers needed rest too, we had done amazingly to get to four months exclusively breastfeeding, and they assured us our babies would be fine. Something didn’t ring true for me and even when I tried, half-heartedly, to mix some pawpaw (the traditional weaning food in Kenya) with expressed milk and offer it to my daughter, she was having none of it.

 photo by H. Anenden

So I called my grandmother. She laughed and asked if I had been reading books again. She carefully explained how breastfeeding was anything but linear. “She’ll tell you when she’s ready for food – and her body will too.”

“What will I do until then?” I was eager to know.

“You do what you did before, regular nyonyo.” So my life slowed down to what felt like a standstill again. While many of my contemporaries marveled at how their children were sleeping longer now that they had introduced baby rice and were even venturing to other foods, I was waking hourly or every two hours with my daughter and telling patients that the return to work wasn’t panning out quite as I had planned.

I soon found that quite unwittingly, I was turning into an informal support service for other urban mothers. My phone number was doing the rounds and many times while I was feeding my baby I would hear myself uttering the words, “Yes, just keep feeding him/ her. Yes, even if you have just fed them. Yes, you might not even manage to get out of your pajamas today. Yes, you still need to eat and drink like a horse. No, now might not be the time to consider going back to work if you can afford not to.” And finally, I assured mothers, “It will get easier.” I had to just trust this last one as it hadn’t gotten easier for me, yet.

A week or so before my daughter turned five months, we traveled to the UK for a wedding and for her to meet family and friends. Because I had very few other demands, I easily kept up her feeding schedule. Despite the disconcerted looks of many strangers as I fed my daughter in many varied public places (most designated breastfeeding rooms were in restrooms which I just could not bring myself to use), we carried on.

At the wedding, the people whose table we sat at noted, “She is such an easy baby – though she does feed a lot.” I kept my silence. Another lady commented, “Though I did read somewhere that African babies don’t cry much.” I could not help but laugh.

My Grandmother’s gentle wisdom:

1. Offer the breast every single moment that your baby is upset – even if you have just fed her.

2. Co-sleep. Many times you can feed your baby before they are fully awake, which will allow them to go back to sleep easier and get you more rest.

3. Always take a flask of warm water to bed with you at night to keep you hydrated and the milk flowing.

4. Make feeding your priority (especially during growth spurts) and get everyone else around you to do as much as they can for you. There is very little that cannot wait.

Read your baby, not the books. Breastfeeding is not linear – it goes up and down and also in circles. You are the expert on your baby’s needs.

photo by E.B. Sylvester

Dr. J. Claire K. Niala is a mother, writer and osteopath who enjoys exploring the differences that thankfully still exist between various cultures around the world. She was born in Kenya and grew up in Kenya, Cote d'Ivoire and the UK. She has worked and lived on three continents and has visited at least one new country every year since she was 12 years old. Her favorite travel companions are her mother and daughter whose stories and interest in others bring her to engage with the world in ways she would have never imagined. Read more from Niala at In Culture Parent.

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Insight In Menstruation and Medicating Women's Feelings

By Julie Holland
Originally published in the New York Times March 1, 2015


Women are moody. By evolutionary design, we are hard-wired to be sensitive to our environments, empathic to our children’s needs and intuitive of our partners’ intentions. This is basic to our survival and that of our offspring. 

Some research suggests that women are often better at articulating their feelings than men because as the female brain develops, more capacity is reserved for language, memory, hearing and observing emotions in others. These are observations rooted in biology, not intended to mesh with any kind of pro- or anti-feminist ideology. But they do have social implications. 

Women’s emotionality is a sign of health, not disease; it is a source of power. But we are under constant pressure to restrain our emotional lives. We have been taught to apologize for our tears, to suppress our anger and to fear being called hysterical. The pharmaceutical industry plays on that fear, targeting women in a barrage of advertising on daytime talk shows and in magazines. 

More Americans are on psychiatric medications than ever before, and in my experience they are staying on them far longer than was ever intended. Sales of antidepressants and antianxiety meds have been booming in the past two decades, and they’ve recently been outpaced by an antipsychotic, Abilify, that is the No. 1 seller among all drugs in the United States, not just psychiatric ones. 

As a psychiatrist practicing for 20 years, I must tell you, this is insane. 

At least one in four women in America now takes a psychiatric medication, compared with one in seven men. Women are nearly twice as likely to receive a diagnosis of depression or anxiety disorder than men are. For many women, these drugs greatly improve their lives. But for others they aren’t necessary. The increase in prescriptions for psychiatric medications, often by doctors in other specialties, is creating a new normal, encouraging more women to seek chemical assistance. Whether a woman needs these drugs should be a medical decision, not a response to peer pressure and consumerism. 

The new, medicated normal is at odds with women’s dynamic biology; brain and body chemicals are meant to be in flux. To simplify things, think of serotonin as the “it’s all good” brain chemical. Too high and you don’t care much about anything; too low and everything seems like a problem to be fixed. 

In the days leading up to menstruation, when emotional sensitivity is heightened, women may feel less insulated, more irritable or dissatisfied. I tell my patients that the thoughts and feelings that come up during this phase are genuine, and perhaps it’s best to re-evaluate what they put up with the rest of the month, when their hormone and neurotransmitter levels are more likely programmed to prompt them to be accommodating to others’ demands and needs. 

The most common antidepressants, which are also used to treat anxiety, are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (S.S.R.I.s) that enhance serotonin transmission. S.S.R.I.s keep things “all good.” But too good is no good. More serotonin might lengthen your short fuse and quell your fears, but it also helps to numb you, physically and emotionally. These medicines frequently leave women less interested in sex. S.S.R.I.s tend to blunt negative feelings more than they boost positive ones. On S.S.R.I.s, you probably won’t be skipping around with a grin; it’s just that you stay more rational and less emotional. Some people on S.S.R.I.s have also reported less of many other human traits: empathy, irritation, sadness, erotic dreaming, creativity, anger, expression of their feelings, mourning and worry. 

Obviously, there are situations where psychiatric medications are called for. The problem is too many genuinely ill people remain untreated, mostly because of socioeconomic factors. People who don’t really need these drugs are trying to medicate a normal reaction to an unnatural set of stressors: lives without nearly enough sleep, sunshine, nutrients, movement and eye contact, which is crucial to us as social primates. If the serotonin levels of women are constantly, artificially high, they are at risk of losing their emotional sensitivity with its natural fluctuations, and modeling a more masculine, static hormonal balance. 

This emotional blunting encourages women to take on behaviors that are typically approved by men: appearing to be invulnerable, for instance, a stance that might help women move up in male-dominated businesses. Primate studies show that giving an S.S.R.I. can augment social dominance behaviors, elevating an animal’s status in the hierarchy. But at what cost? 

I had a patient who called me from her office in tears, saying she needed to increase her antidepressant dosage because she couldn’t be seen crying at work. After dissecting why she was upset — her boss had betrayed and humiliated her in front of her staff — we decided that what was needed was calm confrontation, not more medication. 

Medical chart reviews consistently show that doctors are more likely to give women psychiatric medications than men, especially women between the ages of 35 and 64. For some women in that age group the symptoms of perimenopause can sound a lot like depression, and tears are common. 

Crying isn’t just about sadness. When we are scared, or frustrated, when we see injustice, when we are deeply touched by the poignancy of humanity, we cry. And some women cry more easily than others. It doesn’t mean we’re weak or out of control. 

At higher doses, S.S.R.I.s make it difficult to cry. They can also promote apathy and indifference. Change comes from the discomfort and awareness that something is wrong; we know what’s right only when we feel it. If medicated means complacent, it helps no one. When we are overmedicated, our emotions become synthetic. 

For personal growth, for a satisfying marriage and for a more peaceful world, what we need is more empathy, compassion, receptivity, emotionality and vulnerability, not less. We need to stop labeling our sadness and anxiety as uncomfortable symptoms, and to appreciate them as a healthy, adaptive part of our biology. 


Julie Holland is a psychiatrist in New York and the author of “Moody Bitches: The Truth About the Drugs You’re Taking, the Sleep You’re Missing, the Sex You’re Not Having, and What’s Really Making You Crazy.

Sleep Training: A Review of Research



The following is a list of resources (articles/websites/books) for research-based information on infant sleep, night time parenting, baby crying, need for nourishment and comfort at night, and physiological body and brain responses to 'controlled crying,' 'cry it out,' or 'sleep training' methods. Also see psychological conditioning studies on the brain, immune system, development and learned helplessness (which occurs among babies whose care-givers utilize these methods).

"Crying-it-out does not lead to 'sleeping through the night' - it results in learned helplessness."
-Danelle Frisbie

Articles:
(in alphabetical order)

Adventures in Ezzoland


Ask the Experts: Sleep Training

Babies Aren't Soldiers

Babies Breathe Better During Sleep When Rocked

Baby Dreams [poem] 

Baby Sleep: A Review of Research [with links to articles]

Babies: Not Designed to Sleep Alone

Becoming Wise to Babywise [The Ezzo Method, "Growing Kids God's Way"]

Biological Imperatives: Why Babies Do Not and Should Not Sleep Alone

Breastfeeding in Bed: Miranda Kerr and Orlando Bloom Introduce Baby Flynn

Breastfeeding, Nightwaking: Protection from SIDS

The Case for Cue Feeding

The Con of Controlled Crying

Confessions of a Failed Babywiser

Confessions of an Accidental Cosleeper

CoSleeping Success! 

Crying It Out Causes Brain Damage

The Dangers of Cry It Out (2012)

The Dangers of Leaving Baby to Cry It Out (CIO) (2009)

Dangers of Your Baby 'Crying It Out'

Diverse Contexts of Human Infancy

Dr. William Sears on Growing Kids God's Way/Babywise

Dr. Sears on Babywearing (improves infant sleep, reduces crying and colic)

Excessive Crying Harmful to Babies

Healthy Infant Sleep

Hush Little Baby... [artwork]

I Will Carry You [poem]

Kangaroo Mother Care Saves 2lb Baby (the importance of touch and being held for babies; being close to mom even while asleep)

Milk Drunk (sleeping by baby makes night time parenting much easier!)

Night Time Parenting: A Practical Approach for the Reduction of Attachment Disorders and the Promotion of Emotionally Secure Children

Night Waking Protects Against SIDS

The No-Cry Sleep Solution

On Becoming Elderwise: Caring for Grandma God's Way

Our Bed [poem]

Peacefully Parented Babies Grow to Be Smarter, Kinder Kids  

Peaceful Parenting: Following Your Instincts

Pediatric Nurse and Former Ezzo Parent

Primal Love and Mothering

Reason 742 to Share Sleep

Rooting While at Rest [poem]

The Science of Sharing Sleep 

Seven Benefits of CoSleeping

Shaking a Crying Baby Causes Brain Damage

She's Not 'High Needs' - She's Vivacious! 



Websites:


Ezzo Information Website

Jay Gordon (Sleep: Changing Patterns in the Family Bed)

Parents Against Babywise (Facebook Page)


To connect with other parents and get in on Sleep Forums:
SafeBedSharing.Org

William Sears (31 Ways to Help Your Baby Sleep)


Books:

The No-Cry Sleep Solution

The Baby Sleep Book

Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering

The Baby Bond

The Science of Parenting

Our Babies, Ourselves

Why Love Matters

Nighttime Parenting

The Natural Child: Parenting from the Heart

The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers & Preschoolers

Natural Family Living

The Baby Book

The Continuum Concept: In Search of Happiness Lost

Baby Matters (first edition of The Baby Bond)

The Fussy Baby Book

The Premature Baby Book

Attachment Parenting: A Commonsense Guide to Understanding & Nurturing Your Baby

Primal Health: Understanding the Critical Period Between Conception and the First Birthday

The Attachment Connection: Parenting A Secure & Confident Child

Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby & Young Child

Mothering Magazine 

GOOD Baby Sleep Books Collection 





Lactation Cookies: Increasing Milk Supply

By Danelle Day, PhD © 2010


I am frequently asked to pass along lactation cookie recipes. My own momma has been baking these up since she was a nursing mother and RN, striving to help other new moms with their babies, 35 years ago -- so I've consumed my fair share over the decades. While there are many variations out there, they are all essentially the same and boast three main ingredients commonly believed (in North America) to impact milk supply: oatmeal, brewer's yeast, and flax.

Some home bakers will throw in fenugreek as well, and because this is known to increase milk supply (in both humans and cows!), but hard on the stomach, it isn't a bad idea to add it to foods you'll already be eating (you can open a couple capsules of fenugreek and toss them to the cookie batter). Fenugreek is one of the oldest medicinal herbs used for increasing milk supply, but to do so you will need to consume 1500mg of fenugreek, three times each day. (1) This is more than the recommended amount on the bottle, but the dosing printed on fenugreek labels is not intended to be for boosting milk supply. One study found that when enough fenugreek was consumed, milk supply doubled. (2) Note that while mother's milk teas (with fenugreek) may be a great supplement, and mood-enhancing to sip, you'd have to drink a lot of it to really see an impact. Capsules are a better way to go if you are planning to add fenugreek to your regimen.

So why are these three ingredients the core foundation in lactation cookies?


Oats (or oatmeal) are key in boosting milk supply because of the iron they contain that nursing moms are frequently in need of. Oats are also filling, dense with healthy calories - and nursing moms need calories! Oats are extremely nutritious and easy to work into the diet in a number of ways: cereals, granola, breads, casseroles, meatloaf, cookies - you can add oats to just about anything.Oats are also a great source of fiber. What does fiber have to do with milk supply? My 97 year old grandmother recently discussed the diets of her father's award winning, fatty-milk producing cows back in the 1920s. And guess what they did to increase milk supply? That's right -- boosted the fiber the cows had access to. Farmers have long known this trick, so I suppose milkin' moms can pick up on it too.


Brewer's yeast is an ingredient that has also long been touted to increase milk supply (although contested by some). Brewer's yeast is one of the best natural sources of B vitamins, which are essential to overall health of a nursing mom (and any woman). Even if milk supply were not impacted by brewer's yeast, the boost of energy (and increased sugar metabolism) that comes from brewer's yeast consumption is worth including it in lactation cookies (or other things you bake). Once again, looking back on decades past, women have long passed on the knowledge that sipping a deep, hearty beer (sister to brewer's yeast) has a positive effect on milk supply.


The oil from flax seed is considered by many to be a galactagogue (substance that improves lactation). It is also a great form of fiber. And, while it is again debated among those who believe in flax's galactagogue properties or not, one thing is certain: flax is power packed with omega-3 (essential fatty acids) that are absolutely crucial to a nursing mom's diet (as well as baby's diet, and all human health in general). Human milk is super charged with heavy amounts of omega-3 because the brain (rapidly growing in our babies) is dependent on these fatty acids. It is important that a mother not be deficient in omega-3 (something that many are) and risk her baby not getting enough for optimal health, development, and wellbeing. [Note: artificial forms of omega-3 in manufactured formulas do not respond in a baby's body in the same way that natural omega-3 from mother's milk does. Do not buy into the hype that formulas 'fortified with DHA' are good for your baby. Rather, these artificial baby formulas with DHA have been linked with diarrhea, dehydration, seizures.] That said, omega-3 from fish and flax for mom are wonderful! They not only improve milk quality (and possibly quantity) but also boost brain function, memory, joint lubrication, and help to regulate hormones and decrease postpartum depression. It is unlikely that you could get too much omega-3 today, so when it comes to flax (and low-mercury fish if you like) - eat up!

Before you jump on the lactation cookie making machine and fret about your milk supply, however, know that if you are exclusively breastfeeding (i.e. your baby is consuming nothing but your milk) around the clock (day and night), and your baby is gaining weight (no matter if s/he is in the 99th percentile for weight, or the 1st percentile compared to other babies) then you have a full milk supply suited perfectly for your little one. (3)

It is, of course, good to eat healthy, whole foods to ensure your baby is getting all s/he needs from your milk (and taking a prenatal vitamin while nursing is a good idea too), but studies have shown that even when mother's diet is not the best, her body will compensate (for the sake of her baby) by putting all nutrients into her milk. (4, 5) Therefore, your baby will not suffer as much as you will suffer from poor eating habits. Only in cases of severe malnourishment is milk quality impacted.

That being said, most nursing mothers need to consume a bare minimum of 1800 calories per day to maintain a full milk supply for their growing baby (some will need to eat more to not see a drop in milk), and consuming 2500-2700 calories per day is recommended by most. (6, 7) This is an energy need of 50-125% more than women had in their pre-pregnancy days. So no matter what you eat, do not forget to eat!

Below are two recipes. The first is a recipe for Major Milk Makin' galactagogue cookies ("lactation cookies") that share some similarities with the many generic cookie recipes commonly passed around and posted in a variety of recipe books. This one has just a touch more omega-3, protein, and iron than other "lactation cookies." It was created by Kathleen Major, PNP, RN, in conjunction with a local lactation specialist and LLL leader in the Cedar Valley (IA) hospitals in the early 1990s when Major was focusing her practice on pediatric health. She has granted permission for DrMomma.org to share her recipe. Please do not reproduce without crediting her and linking back to this page. The second recipe is my own, and while it is not as sweet (no sugar), it is all the more healthy and packed with beneficial ingredients. My cookies are slightly more like granola in cookie form -- you can be sure they are good for you, if this is your goal.

While no lactation cookie will miraculously boost your milk supply if there are other hormone related factors weighing on you, (for example, you are going to have to nurse and/or pump - increase demand - to increase supply, and be physically close to your baby - holding/wearing/rocking/sleeping, as much as possible), they certainly won't hurt -- may help a smidge -- and will ensure you are getting some good, wholesome (much needed!) calories packed with omega-3, nutrients, and goodness along the way.

If you enjoy baking and try out these recipes (or any other you find online or create yourself), please let me know your favorites. I'll admit I rarely stick straight to the recipe. I inherited my parents tendency to throw things into the batch (or leave things out if they aren't in my cupboard at the time). Some sesame seeds here, pumpkin seeds there...a bit of Fenugreek or a handful of sunflower seeds. I often substitute extra milled flax or applesauce for the butter, and toss in extra oats, or a scoop of almond butter if it looks like the batter can handle it. So if you are like me, and have additional special tips that make your homemade lactation cookie creations stand out among the milkin' moms - please, share!

A few notes on the recipes:

1) Flax seed is prepped many ways. The version most useful for baking is the milled flax seed that you will find in your local store. It typically comes in a bag or a box (depending on the brand you select). You may have to go to a health food, whole foods store, or large supermarket to find the brewer's yeast which typically comes in a can.

2) Whole oats should always be used - not 'quick' oats (the type that cook in a few minutes in the microwave). Be sure when you buy your oats ('oatmeal') that you are purchasing whole, natural oats.

3) I'd suggest purchasing eggs from a local farm or buying free range "happy chicken" eggs at your grocery store - especially with all the recalls on salmonella tainted eggs lately. And who wants to support the massive hen house operations? Not us. Be informed on where your food comes from, and teach your kids too.


Major Milk Makin' Cookies
Recipe by Kathleen Major
Detailed recipe with photos found here


1 1/2 c. whole wheat flour
1 3/4 c. oats
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
3/4 c. almond butter or peanut butter
1/2 c. butter, softened
1 c. flax
3 T brewer's yeast
1/3 c. water
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 c. sugar
1/2 c. brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 large eggs
2 c. (12oz) chocolate chips
1 c. chopped nuts of your choice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit

Combine flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt in a bowl.
In a large bowl, beat almond butter, butter, sugar, brown sugar, vanilla, brewer's yeast, flax and water until creamy.
Mix in eggs.
Gradually beat in flour mixture.
Mix in nuts and chocolate chips.
Add oats slowly, mixing along the way.

Place balls of dough onto greased baking sheets or baking stones.
Press down each ball lightly with a fork.
Bake 12 minutes.


Momma's Milk Cookies
recipe by Danelle Day

2 eggs
1/2 c. unsweetened applesauce
1 c. flax
1 1/2 c. whole wheat flour
1/2 c. melted butter
2 c. Agave nectar
3/4 c. walnuts (crushed)
2 c. chocolate chips
3/4 c. raisins
4 T water
1 tsp vanilla
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
4 T brewer's yeast
3 c. oats

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit

I have found greased cookie sheets work best, but you can also use parchment lined sheets or a baking stone.

In a bowl mix flax and water until thoroughly mixed.
In a large bowl mix flour, baking soda, salt and brewer's yeast.
In another bowl mix together butter and ONE cup Agave nectar (the other cup will be used later). Stir well until the butter and nectar are completely mixed.
Add eggs to the nectar mix, stirring well after each one.
Add vanilla, stir.
Add the nectar blend to the flax and mix well. (A hand mixer or mixing bowl works best)
Pour the nectar/flax blend into the large bowl of flour and mix well.
Mix in walnuts, chocolate chips, raisins.
Mix in oats.
After everything is blended together well, add the applesauce and final 1 cup of Agave nectar and stir through well.

Scoop onto sheets, and press down each ball of dough lightly with a fork.
Bake 13-14 minutes.


Vegan options for both recipes:

In place of eggs - 3 tsp of egg replacer mixed with 4 T water OR 4 tsp of milled flax with 4 T water.

In place of butter - butter substitute like Earth Balance OR 3/4 the amount worth of Canola oil or Crisco (although Crisco is not a healthy option) OR 1/2 c. milled flax and 1/2 c. applesauce


Have the need for special lactation cookies, but no time to cook?
There are many lactation cookie producers now who sell and ship online.

(100% dairy free!)




Ordered cookies stay good for 6 months in the freezer (and taste good frozen too)! Several of these cookies have some added bonuses - pumpkin seeds, kelp, hemp seeds, sesame seeds, nettles, clover, peppermint, poppyseeds and Fenugreek. Making Mama's Milk & More Cookies are specially created by a mom herself, are organic and 100% dairy free. In addition, she recently started making a vegan lactation cookie for special order.

You can always add these extras into YOUR homemade lactation cookies (or muffins!) as well, but these are great shops for cookie purchasing if that's up your alley.



For more information on boosting milk supply, see:

Making More Milk: Breastfeeding, Supply and the Feedback Inhibitor of Lactation by Danelle Frisbie

The Breastfeeding Mother's Guide to Making More Milk (book)

Breastfeeding Made Simple (book)

Nursing Mother, Working Mother (book)

Milk Supply in the First 6 Weeks by Paula Yount

Balancing Breastfeeding: When Moms Must Work by Danelle Frisbie, Ph.D, M.A. [includes suggestions that impact milk supply due to women's powerful hormones whether working away from baby or not]

Increasing the Milk Supply [pdf] by Dr. Carolyn Lawlor-Smith, BMBS, IBCLC, FRACGP and Dr. Laureen Lawlor-Smith, BMBS, IBCLC

How Can I Increase My Milk Supply? by Becky Flora, IBCLC

Increasing Milk Supply
by Janet Talmadge, IBCLC

Increasing Your Milk Supply by Anne Smith, IBCLC

Increasing Low Milk Supply on KellyMom.com

Human Milk Donors and Donations Resource Page (for those who find they must supplement their own supply)

Additional information for nursing mothers (books, websites, articles) can be found on the Breastfeeding Resources page.

The Breastfeeding Group for nursing moms: FB.com/groups/Breastfed


Notes:

1) Breastfeeding Made Simple, p.219

2) Swafford S, Berens P. Effect of fenugreek on breast milk volume. ABM News & Views. 6(3):21

Abo El-Nor S. Influence of fenugreek seeds as a galactagogue on milk yield. Egypt J Dairy Sci. 27:231-8.

3) Breastfeeding Made Simple, p.130

4) Lunn P, Prentice A, Austin S, Whitehead, R. Influence of maternal diet on plasma-prolactin levels during lactation. Lancet. 1(8169):623-5

5) Smith C. Effects of maternal undernutrition upon the newborn infant in Holland (1944-1945). Journal of Pediatrics. 30(3):229-43.

6) Strode M, Dewey K, Lonnerdal B. Effects of short-term caloric restriction on lactational performance of well-nourished women. Acta Paediatr Scand. 75(2):222-9.

7) Making More Milk, p.84


~~~~


Danelle Day specialized in lactation science and human health and development during her graduate training. After teaching and conducting research at the collegiate level, she left academia to pursue another passion - mothering. She is currently completing credentials to serve others as an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant and helps run the non-profit organization, peaceful parenting, and DrMomma.org.

Cuddling Babies Positively Alters Genes

By David Neild for Science Alert
Published to Peaceful Parenting with permission


Cuddling Babies Positively Impacts Genetics

The amount of close and comforting contact that young infants receive doesn't just keep them warm, snug, and loved. A 2017 study says it can actually affect babies at the molecular level, and the effects can last for years. Based on the study, babies who get less physical contact and are more distressed at a young age, end up with changes in molecular processes that affect gene expression.

The team from the University of British Columbia in Canada emphasizes that it's still very early days for this research, and it's not clear exactly what's causing the change. But it could give scientists some useful insights into how touching affects the epigenome - the biochemical changes that influence gene expression in the body.

During the study, parents of 94 babies were asked to keep diaries of their touching and cuddling habits from five weeks after birth, as well as logging the behaviour of the infants – sleeping, crying, and so on. Four-and-a-half years later, DNA swabs were taken of the kids to analyse a biochemical modification called DNA methylation. It's an epigenetic mechanism in which some parts of the chromosome are tagged with small carbon and hydrogen molecules, often changing how genes function and affecting their expression.

The researchers found DNA methylation differences between "high-contact" children and "low-contact" children at five specific DNA sites, two of which were within genes: one related to the immune system, and one to the metabolic system. DNA methylation also acts as a marker for normal biological development and the processes that go along with it, and it can be influenced by external, environmental factors as well.

Then there was the epigenetic age, the biological ageing of blood and tissue. This marker was lower than expected in the kids who hadn't had much contact as babies, and had experienced more distress in their early years, compared with their actual age. "In children, we think slower epigenetic aging could reflect less favorable developmental progress," said one of the team, Michael Kobor.

In fact, similar findings were spotted in a study from 2013 looking at how much care and attention young rats were given from a very early age. Gaps between epigenetic age and chronological age have been linked to health problems in the past, but again it's too soon to draw those kind of conclusions: the scientists readily admit they don't yet know how this will affect the kids later in life. We are also talking about less than 100 babies in the study, but it does seem that close contact and cuddles do somehow change the body at a genetic level.

Of course it's well accepted that human touch is good for us and our development in all kinds of ways, but this is the first study to look at how it might be changing the epigenetics of human babies. It will be the job of further studies to work out why, and to investigate whether any long-term changes in health might appear as a consequence. "We plan to follow up on whether the 'biological immaturity' we saw in these children carries broad implications for their health, especially their psychological development," said one of the researchers, Sarah Moore. "If further research confirms this initial finding, it will underscore the importance of providing physical contact, especially for distressed infants."

The research was published in Development and Psychopathology.



*******




There is No App to Replace Your Lap




There’s no app to replace your lap. πŸ’žπŸ’ž Snuggle close.

Artwork from a page in the beautiful Cami Kangaroo series by Stacy C. Bauer: https://amzn.to/2ZGO1gW

The Perfect Bath


There is a lot of confusion today about what constitutes the most soothing, most healing, bath for those with inflammation, redness, irritation, yeast, etc. This is the perfect bath for such situations -- kids as well as for adults who face the same, or simply want a natural, healing detox bath. 🌊 Reduce quantities of each item for skin baths (or baby sized baths). Skip the soaps for youngsters (as this disrupts pH and microflora) and stick with epsom salt and a little boron or food grade DE.

More on proper intact care: http://www.DrMomma.org/2009/06/how-to-care-for-intact-penis-protect.html

Some of our favorites on Amazon:

• Epsom salt (plain, no dyes, perfumes, or oils): https://amzn.to/2QfwTJq
• Boron (Borax or other brands): https://amzn.to/2Q87B02
• Calmoseptine: https://amzn.to/2Yj9f3t
• Food grade DE: https://amzn.to/2Q99jhL


Nursery Ideas for Your Newborn

 

Having a baby is an exciting, life-changing moment, and one of the things you have to look forward to is designing their nursery. If this is your first child, there's the added thrill of doing it all for the first time—so exciting that shopping for diapers can seem like fun. Remember that your baby will spend several hours in this nursery, and it's where you'll experience most of their formative moments together. From changing diapers to hearing your baby's first laugh and seeing their first attempts to climb out of the crib, there's a lot of fun things to anticipate. 

Even though decorating a nursery is fun, it can be an overwhelming task for a first-time parent. You don't want to spend your pregnancy trying to determine whether you need a bassinet and a crib and whether a changing table is essential. If this is your first time buying things for a baby, you're probably wondering whether you need all the accessories, like wipe warmers, diaper genies, and baby swings. You also have to think about the color palette, whether you want a specific theme or an evergreen look that you can quickly transform into another room later. 

All the options may make it seem like too much to handle, but there's a way to make it a fun, easy task instead. Make a list of everything you may need before you start, and incorporate the rest slowly after the baby is born. If you want to design your dream nursery before bringing your newborn home, here are a few great ideas. 

1. Invest in the right crib mattress. 

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The bed that your baby sleeps on may not have anything to do with whether they sleep soundly through the night. There's nothing wrong with your baby waking up several times through the night—sleepless nights are part of life with a newborn. Still, there's no reason why your baby shouldn't have the best bed you can get for them. So, start your nursery-decorating by buying a great crib, and follow that up with a comfortable crib mattress. 

Consider a durable mattress that you can get custom-fitted to the sort of crib you're thinking of buying for your baby's room. Reliable mattresses from a reputable brand—like one from the Stearns and Foster mattress collection—are the best option. Make sure you consider whether you need the new mattress to have an adjustable base and what the warranty covers before making your decision. 

2. Dress up your walls.

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If you're planning to paint the walls of your nursery, consider using color psychology to pick the best shade for your baby. While you may think it doesn't matter much to your baby, babies are exceptionally perceptive about color. It's also important to consider texture and durability when you're picking paint or wallpaper for your nursery. You don't want rough wallpaper to scratch your baby's skin or chipped paint falling where your baby could accidentally ingest it. 

Go beyond paint or wallpaper when you're decorating your baby's room and add some character to the walls. Cartoon character-themed wallpaper is excellent, but consider adding paintings, framed letters, or other wall accessories to the room. Commissioning a canvas painting or buying a ready one is a great way to perk up the nursery. You can also get a DIY canvas kit from an artist website like Paint Loose. You'll be surprised at what you can create with a canvas, a palette of watercolors, oils, or acrylics, and your newborn as inspiration. 

3. Personalize your baby's room.

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Whether you're shopping for curios, toys, curtains, or pillows, think about how you can personalize them to fit in with your baby room dΓ©cor. A well-designed nursery deserving of space in a home-design catalog sounds good, but it isn't as cozy as a personalized space. Add a touch of familial warmth with knick-knacks from friends and family, a wall of pictures, or a customized photo-blanket. 

You can get a custom activity play mat, put your baby's name up in lights on the wall, or create a custom baby mobile to hang above the crib. If you don't already have wallpaper or freshly painted walls, consider leaving one wall blank so you can create a mural on the wall for your child. 

4. Make babyproof items look good. 

While it's fun to focus on the aesthetics of your baby's room, remember to focus on safety as well. It's crucial to know how to keep your baby safe from accidents, whether you're in the house or outside. Before you spend too much on toys and accessories, invest in quality babyproofing products. 

Remember that babyproofing doesn't have to be boring. You can customize everything from a door latch cover to a crib bumper to make it match your design theme or to look more attractive. You can also create many babyproofing items yourself. For example, consider making a wall of softness inside the crib with thin pillows or thick fabrics and foam, so your newborn isn't hurt by the bars on the side of the crib. 

5. Plan to convert it into a toddler room.

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You may be decorating it as a nursery now, but your baby will eventually need a more grownup room. Since not everyone can afford to update their interiors every few years, it's a good idea to ensure that things like furniture and wall color are evergreen. This way, you can switch the room around to suit your child as they grow without any major renovations.

Pick removable wall accessories, easily removable wallpaper, and consider buying a crib that has space for a larger mattress than your baby needs as a newborn. You can put up a bed frame as your baby grows old enough to sleep outside the cot and still save on having to get a new mattress immediately. 

You can also build a changing table on top of a dresser instead of buying a dedicated table to hold diapers and baby products. Once your baby is potty-trained, you can still use the dresser or chest of drawers. Do the same with the pattern on your rugs, and consider ditching character-themed curtains. Instead, pick curtains in durable fabrics in a variety of different colors that will look great in a baby's room as well as a toddler's. 

6. Choose fun lighting options.

A great way to add a little fun to your baby's room is to focus on the lighting. Pick overhanging lights with fun, hanging fixtures, lamps with cartoon characters on the shades, and nightlights in fun shapes. You can also have some fun with ceiling lights—buy LED lights in various shapes and colors to fix to the ceiling instead of tube lights or recessed lights. You can use light-up letters as a nightlight for your baby or get a soothing night light that doubles up as a sound machine to help your baby fall asleep faster.

7. Consider durable furnishings.

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Are you already worried about all the spots and stains on your rugs, furniture, and walls? You won't have to think of any of that if you get durable furnishings. Use outdoor or washable fabrics on any furniture in the room. If you're using old furniture, add removable covers to it so you can switch them out when there's a spill. Another good idea is washable wallpaper and putting plastic sheets or mattress protectors under your bedsheets to avoid ruining the mattress.

Kinderpack





We love Kindercarry's Kinderpack! Especially for bigger/taller/heavier babies, toddlers and children -- this is the most comfortable carrier we have tried, and it is a favorite among our local babywearing lending library. When Peaceful Parenting began (2005) there was no such thing as a comfortable soft structured carrier (SSC) for a heavy/large baby or toddler. With the Kinderpack we can comfortably babywear for many hours, day after day, and do so with special needs children as well. It is truly a blessing in babywearing, and one we'd love everyone to experience. You can learn more about Kinderpacks and their small-batch, USA handmade construction at the Kindercarry homepage.


Each Kinderpack below comes to you brand new, with tags attached, in its original packaging, and has never been tried on, unless otherwise noted. Photos are of the actual carrier you will receive and the listing will be removed from this page upon purchase. Many Kinderpacks below have Plus padded straps because they are perfect for every body type and can be adjusted for a comfortable babywearing fit for parents of all sizes, and shared between parents. New Kinderpacks below include FREE 2-day priority shipping in the United States and to APO/FPO addresses. International shipping is $18 to Canada and $34 to all other nations. Email: ContactDrMomma{at}gmail.com

With each Kinderpack you'll receive two Born 2B Worn advocacy bracelets in cool colors (blue/purple/teal) and warm colors (red/orange/hot pink). Kinderpacks arrive brand new, never tried on, in their zippered pouch, with all paperwork, unless otherwise noted.


Note: No one at Peaceful Parenting has been given any incentive of any kind to speak upon Kinderpacks. We love Kinderpacks, have shared locally for many years, and would like to help other families have access to one that fits their needs. Packs were purchased brand new, directly from Kindercarry, at full retail costs plus shipping. Any pack sold for less is one we lose funds on.

Any amount donated beyond retail/shipping/fees/taxes goes toward Peaceful Parenting education at maternity and baby expos where materials are given freely to new and expecting families; as well as toward the non-profit work that Peaceful Parenting takes on (birth, breastfeeding, baby care supplies and support for low-income families, mothers, and to orphanages overseas). If you have a Kinderpack you'd like to give toward this effort (to share freely with another family in need, or to send with an orphanage volunteer working with babies/toddlers), write to ContactDrMomma{at}gmail.com

Shopping at the main Kindercarry site? Click here to get $10 off your purchase. The majority of Kinderpacks we have below are also $10 off retail, with free priority shipping.

Email is responded to within 24 hours, and Kinderpacks are shipped within 1 business day that USPS is open. If you do not receive a response, please check the email address you are sending to, or your junk/spam filter.

Three different options to purchase: 

1) Click the Purchase button under the Kinderpack you wish to buy. [PayPal takes a percentage with this option and it is processed as a Goods Business Transaction]

2) Send via check or money order to:
Peaceful Parenting
P.O. Box 1302
Virginia Beach, VA 23451
*personal checks will have to clear before Kinderpack is sent; email ContactDrMomma{at}gmail.com before sending check so that your new KP is held for you

3) If you are local to Virginia Beach and would like to meet, please email. We have regular fitting dates with parents in the community, attend the majority of maternity and baby expos in the area, and would be happy to meet with you anytime.

KINDERPACKS BY SIZE:
Infant • Standard • Toddler • Preschool

INFANT
Kinderpacks are $10 below retail, with free 2-day shipping, except for specialty prints.
Each Kinderpack is brand new and ships within 1 business day with tracking and insurance.
Each new Kinderpack comes to you with two "Born to be Worn" bracelets in cool and warm colors.

The Good Fight Duo - Infant Standard
Limited Edition, Rare one time release
Matching pink/white polkadot hoody-hood
SALE $159, shipping included
PURCHASE

Classic Black - Infant Plus
full panel black, with matching polka-dot hoody hood
SALE $174, shipping included
PURCHASE

• SPECIALTY PRINTS •

Terrapin Riptide Duo - Infant Plus
Hard to access, 2 time release
Matching turtles hoody-hood with navy canvas
SALE $174, shipping included
PURCHASE

Starstruck Full Panel - Infant Plus
Black Canvas; Glow in the Dark Stars
Very Rare Semi-Custom, Matching hoody-hood
SALE $199, shipping included
pending family in Florida

Starstruck with Black Koolnit - Infant Plus
Custom Black Canvas; Glow in the Dark Stars
Very Rare Semi-Custom, Black Koolnit hood
SALE $194, shipping included
pending family in Ohio


Starstruck Kinderpack's Glow in the Dark Stars at Night

STANDARD
Kinderpacks are $10 below retail, with free 2-day shipping, except for specialty prints.
Each Kinderpack is brand new and ships within 1 business day with tracking and insurance.
Each new Kinderpack comes to you with two "Born to be Worn" bracelets in cool and warm colors.


Classic Black - Standard Plus with Koolnit
Black Canvas, with Black Koolnit hood
SALE $154, shipping included
PURCHASE

Classic Black - Standard Plus
full panel with matching polka-dot hoody hood
SALE $154, shipping included
PURCHASE

Fairytale - Standard Standard
Dark Grey Canvas, Matching full panel hoody-hood
SALE $149, shipping included
PURCHASE

• SPECIALTY PRINTS •


Aquarius Duo - Standard Plus
Popular sea creatures duo with aqua canvas
matching sea creatures hoody-hood
SALE $154, shipping included
PURCHASE

Posey Pinwheel Duo - Standard Plus
One of the most popular duos!
Matching pinwheel hoody-hood (example pictured below)
SALE $164, shipping included
PURCHASE

Starstruck Full Panel - Standard Plus
Black Canvas; Glow in the Dark Stars
Very Rare Semi-Custom, Matching Hoody-Hood
SALE $199, shipping included
PURCHASE

Starstruck with Black Koolnit - Standard Plus
Custom Black Canvas; Glow in the Dark Stars
Very Rare Semi-Custom with Black Canvas, Black Koolnit Hood
SALE $184, shipping included
PURCHASE


TODDLER
Kinderpacks are $10 below retail, with free 2-day shipping, except for specialty prints.
Each Kinderpack is brand new and ships within 1 business day with tracking and insurance.
Each new Kinderpack comes to you with two "Born to be Worn" bracelets in cool and warm colors.

Hop To It - Toddler Plus with Koolnit
Very Hard to Find, Retired print
SALE $164, shipping included
PURCHASE


Fairytale - Toddler Standard
Matching full panel hoody-hood, dark grey canvas
SALE $159, shipping included
PURCHASE

Classic Black Full Panel - Toddler Plus
matching polka-dot hoody hood (pictured below)
SALE $164, shipping included
PURCHASE

Twilight - Toddler Plus with Koolnit
with matching black Koolnit hood
SALE $164, shipping included
PURCHASE

• SPECIALTY PRINTS • 

Posey Pinwheel Duo - Toddler Standard
One of the most popular duos!
Matching pinwheel hoody-hood (example pictured below)
SALE $169, shipping included
PURCHASE

Posey Pinwheel Duo - Toddler Plus
One of the most popular duos!
Matching pinwheel hoody-hood (example pictured above)
SALE $174, shipping included
PURCHASE

Constellations Full Panel - Toddler Plus
Navy Canvas, Matching Hoody-hood
Hard to access print, special glow in the dark fabric that retails higher
Matching hoody-hood (see example below)
SALE $179, shipping included
PURCHASE
Kinderpack Constellations Full Panel Hoody-Hood example

Constellations Full Panel - Toddler Plus
Black Canvas, Matching Hoody-hood
Hard to access print, special glow in the dark fabric that retails higher
Matching hoody-hood (see example above)
SALE $179, shipping included
Starstruck with Black Koolnit - Toddler Standard
Custom Black Canvas; Glow in the Dark Stars
Very Rare Semi-Custom with black canvas & black Koolnit
SALE $179, shipping included
PURCHASE


PRESCHOOL
Kinderpacks are $10 below retail, with free 2-day shipping, except for specialty prints.
Each Kinderpack is brand new and ships within 1 business day with tracking and insurance.
Each new Kinderpack comes to you with two "Born to be Worn" bracelets in cool and warm colors.

Zombie Apocalypse 2 - Preschool Plus
with matching full panel hoody-hood
SALE $164, shipping included
PURCHASE

Fairytale - Preschool Standard
with matching full panel hoody-hood
SALE $159, shipping included
PURCHASE

The Good Fight Duo - Preschool Standard
Matching polkadot white/pink hoody-hood
Limited Edition - One Time Release
SALE $159, shipping included
PURCHASE

 Regatta with Navy Koolnit - Preschool Plus
Matching Navy Koolnit Hood
SALE $164, shipping included
PURCHASE

• SPECIALTY PRINTS •


Terrapin / Riptide Duo - Preschool Standard
Matching turtles hoody-hood; very hard-to-find, 2-time release
SALE $179, includes shipping

 Posey Pinwheel Duo - Preschool Standard
One of the most popular duos!
Matching pinwheel hoody-hood (example pictured below)
SALE $169, shipping included
PURCHASE

Webs We Weave - Preschool Standard with Koolnit
Matching black Koolnit Hood
Rare, one-time-release + custom; glow-in-the-dark special fabric.
SALE $169, includes 2-day shipping
Pictured: Webs' glow in the dark pattern at night

Starstruck with Black Koolnit - Preschool Standard
Custom Black Canvas / Glow in the Dark Stars / Black KN Hood
Very Rare Semi-Custom with black canvas and koolnit
 pending new family in New Jersey
Starstruck Kinderpack's Glow in the Dark Stars at Night

*******

Straps: Standard or Plus: 4 extra inches of padding along strap
Parents of all sizes use and love plus straps:

Perfect Fit Adjusters
(making plus straps perfect for every babywearer)


All babywearing families are welcome to join:
Kinderpack B/S/T Chat Group

Where our Kinderpacks have gone... Please feel free to drop us a note or share a photo anytime (ContactDrMomma {at} gmail.com). We love connecting with families and seeing your little ones grow, wrapped up in love. ♥ Thank you for letting us be a part of your babywearing adventure!

Starstruck (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Ohio family

Starstruck (Infant Plus) - Florida family

The Good Fight Duo (Infant Plus) - Minnesota family

Starstruck (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - New Jersey family

Posey Pinwheel Duo (Infant Plus) - Iowa family

Terrapin (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Starstruck (Toddler Standard) - California family

Terrapin Tide (Toddler Standard) - New Jersey family

Constellations (Infant Plus) - Washington family

Constellations (Preschool Standard) - Tennessee family

Starstruck (Preschool Standard) - California family

DIY Butterfly (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Regatta (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Michigan family

Terrapin (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Blue Poppies (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - North Carolina family

Constellations (Preschool Standard, Black Canvas) - Maryland family

Constellations (Preschool Standard, Black Canvas) - Georgia family

Constellations (Preschool Plus, Navy Canvas) - Texas family

Skulls and Roses (Preschool Plus) - Oregon family

Starstruck (Preschool Standard) - Florida family

Hollow (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Oklahoma family

Classic Black (Standard Standard, Koolnit) - Illinois family

Regatta (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - Kansas family

POUNCE! (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - New York family

Terrapin (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Iowa family

Terrapin (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - South Carolina family

In the Round (Infant Standard, Koolnit) - Ohio family
*this new Kinderpack was sold to fund a larger size going to an in-need orphanage in Mongolia

Indigo Bloom (Toddler Plus) - California family

Summit (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - New York family

Safari (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Washington family

Geared Up (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Oklahoma family

Constellations (Infant Plus) - Military family overseas

Classic Black (Infant Plus) - gifted to Wisconsin family

Fantasy Forest (Preschool Plus) - The Netherlands family

Fly By Night Duo (Preschool Standard) - Massachusetts family

Terrapin (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Summit (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - Maryland family

Constellations (Standard Plus) - Singapore family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Preschool Plus) - Iowa family

Dragons (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Constellations (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Delaware family

Terrapin Tide (Preschool Plus) - Virginia family

Suckerpunch (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Illinois family

Hollow (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Indiana family

Hollow (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Florida family

Riptide (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Virginia family

Chesapeake (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - South Carolina family

Summit (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Minnesota family

Hollow (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Minnesota family

Riptide (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Pennsylvania family

Serengeti (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Arizona family

Synergy (Toddler Standard, Koolnit) - Virginia family

Heartland (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Ohio family

Twilight (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Military family

Summit (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Summit (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Michigan family

Suckerpunch (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Batik Roses (Preschool Standard) - Georgia family

Alice [in Wonderland] (Preschool Plus) - U.K. family

Shark Attack (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Florida family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Infant Plus) - Missouri family

Constellations (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Massachusetts family

Aqua Bubbles (Preschool Standard) - California family

Fantasy Forest (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Pennsylvania family

Heartland (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - New Jersey family

Suckerpunch (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - New Jersey family

Fantasy Forest (Infant Plus) - Pennsylvania family

Terrapin (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Fairytale (Infant Plus) - New Jersey family

Classic Black (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - North Carolina family

Batik Roses (Standard Plus) - South Carolina family

Constellations (Preschool Standard) - Illinois family

Terrapin (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Batik Roses (Toddler Plus) - New Zealand family

Indigo Bloom (Infant Plus) - Texas family

Chesapeake (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Heartland (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Minnesota family

Narwhal (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Oregon family

Artemis (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

POUNCE! (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - New Jersey family

Shark Plank Duo (Infant Plus) - Texas family

Monster Mash 2014 (Toddler Standard, Koolnit) - Washington family

Twilight (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Colorado family

Terrapin (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Georgia family

POUNCE! (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Connecticut family

Classic Black (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Brilliant Beards (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Canadian family

Clementine (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - South Carolina family

Brilliant Beards (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Washington family

Classic Black (Standard Standard, Koolnit) - Tennessee family

Fairytale (Preschool Standard) - Arizona family

Riptide (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Missouri

POUNCE! (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Dragons (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - California family

Aquarius Duo (Preschool Standard) - Georgia family

Dino-Mite (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Pennsylvania family

Suckerpunch (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Classic Black (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - New York family

Shark Plank Duo (Infant Plus) - Texas family

Party Hearty (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Illinois family

Riptide (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Alaska family

Suckerpunch (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - Florida family

Dragons (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Shark Plank Duo (Toddler Plus) - Kansas family

Midnight Floral (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Washington family

Lotis (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - New Jersey family

Rhino Romp (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Minnesota family

Skulls & Roses (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Ohio family

Fairytale (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Florida family

Constellations (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Utah family

Rhino Romp (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - New York family

Inked! (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - South Dakota family

Terrapin (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Florida family

Riptide (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Fantasy Forest (Standard Standard, Koolnit) - California family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Preschool Standard) - Virginia family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Preschool Plus) - Florida family

Riptide (Toddler Standard, Koolnit) - Maryland family

Superkids (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Georgia family

Terrapin (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - Maryland family

Shark Plank Duo (Preschool Standard) - Delaware family

Trophy Too (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Constellations (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - California family

Chesapeake (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Regatta (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Alaska family

Shark Attack (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Heartland (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - North Carolina family

Bee Sweeter Duo (Infant Plus) - California family

Summit (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Wisconsin family

Constellations (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Washington family

Constellations (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Washington family

Dragons (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Louisiana family

Terrapin (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Hollow [Limited Edition] (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - Michigan family

Voyage (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Singapore family

Aqua Bubbles (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Wisconsin family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Infant Standard) - Wisconsin family

Bearly Sleeping (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Ohio family

Aqua Bubbles (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - New York family

Fly By Night Duo (Infant Plus) - California family

Chesapeake (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - Florida family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Toddler Standard) - California family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Toddler Plus) - Florida family

Terrapin (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Florida family

Voyage (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Ohio family

Voyage (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Virginia family

Heartland (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Dino-Mite (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Florida family

Aqua Bubbles (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Wisconsin family

Fly By Night Duo (Standard Plus) - Pennsylvania family

Aqua Bubbles (Standard Standard, Koolnit) - Florida family

Batik Roses (Infant Plus) - Ohio family

Alice [in Wonderland] (Infant Plus) - California family

Voyage (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Nevada family

Constellations (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Riptide (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Sky High (Infant Standard, Koolnit) - Alaska family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Standard Plus) - Washington family

In the Round (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Ohio family

In the Round (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Constellations (Preschool Standard) - Washington family

Clementine (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Pennsylvania family

Clementine (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Georgia family

Dragons (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Missouri family

Dino-Mite (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Pennsylvania family

Indigo Bloom (Infant Standard) - Utah family

Alice [in Wonderland] (Toddler Standard) - Washington family

Riptide (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - California family

Beards (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Kansas family

Voyage (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Maryland family

Aquarius Duo (Infant Plus) - Pennsylvania family

Constellations (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Wisconsin family

Indigo Bloom (Infant Plus) - UK family

Classic Black (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - California family

DIY Butterfly (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Germany family

Batik Roses (Infant Plus) - APO Military family

Classic Black (Infant Standard, Koolnit) - Massachusetts family

Webs We Weave [Limited Edition] (Infant Standard, Koolnit) - Singapore family

Webs We Weave [Limited Edition] (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Virginia family

Webs We Weave [Limited Edition] (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - Hawaii family

Webs We Weave [Limited Edition] (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Illinois family

Elephant Romp (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Connecticut family

Skulls and Roses (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Florida family

In Focus (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Florida family

Little Wing (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Georgia family

Dino-Mite (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - California family

Adorned (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Michigan family

Terrapin (Infant Standard, Koolnit) - Virginia family

Terrapin (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - Hong Kong family

Chesapeake (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Georgia family

Mermaids (Infant Plus) - Spain family

Summit (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Alaska family

Skulls and Roses (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Oregon family

Fairytale (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Florida family

Heartland (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - South Carolina family

Riptide (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

Constellations (Infant Plus) - Missouri family

Sky High (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Texas family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Preschool Standard) - North Carolina family

Shark Attack (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Tennessee family

Constellations (Preschool Standard) - Washington family

Derby (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Germany family

Regatta (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - New Mexico family

SuperKids (Infant Standard, Koolnit) - California family

Summit (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Australia family

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Preschool Standard) - Alberta, Canada family

Riptide (Standard Standard, Koolnit) - California family

Shady Savannah (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - Ohio family

Dino-Mite (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Michigan family

In Focus (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Washington family

Bearly Sleeping (Standard Standard, Koolnit) - Singapore family

Zombie Apocalypse 2 (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - Virginia family

Shady Savannah (Toddler Plus, Koolnit) - Arkansas family

Riptide (Preschool Standard, Koolnit) - Illinois family

Twilight (Infant Plus, Koolnit) - Minnesota family

Twilight (Standard Plus, Koolnit) - gifted to California/Texas military family 

[Harry Potter] Wiz Kid (Infant Plus) - gifted to Wisconsin family 

Posey Pinwheel Duo (Infant Plus) - gifted to Wisconsin family 

Posey Pinwheel Duo (Preschool Plus) - gifted to Virginia family 

Bee Sweeter Duo (Preschool Plus) - gifted to Virginia family 

Riptide (Toddler Plus) - gifted to Virginia family 

Blue Poppies (Preschool Plus, Koolnit) - gifted to Virginia family 

Shark Plank Duo (Toddler Plus) - gifted to Virginia family 

Heartland (Preschool Standard) - gifted to Virginia family 

Constellations (Preschool Plus) - gifted to Virginia family 

Used KPs from our Birth & Babies Lending library and donations to orphanage volunteers in Uganda, Mongolia, Indonesia, Philippines, Haiti. ♥


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