Texas City, Texas Nurse-In Sign in Support of Breastfeeding Mother Removed from Pool

Angie Dunn with her sign at the Texas City Nurse-In.

Angie Dunn's sign at the Nessler Family Aquatic Center Nurse-In in Texas City, Texas reads, "Out of Milk since '99, but like a good bra STILL SUPPORTIVE! #NormalizeBreastfeeding"

She writes, "It was all about that sweet mommy and her babies. She is such a nice lady. She walked up and gave me a hug and I just melted. I think things will turn around in a positive way for her and the other moms from this point forward."

Misty and her baby, 10 months old.

On June 8, 2019, breastfeeding mother, Misty Daugereaux, was forced to leave the center because she was breastfeeding her 10 month old infant. This action violates Texas law, which protects mothers and their nursing babies of any age in locations where moms are otherwise permitted to be.

Misty writes, "Stand for nothing, and you'll fall for anything. I got kicked out of Nessler Family Aquatica In Texas City today for BREASTFEEDING MY SON! First, I had a lifeguard come from behind me, as I was discretely soothing my crying baby, and told me I couldn't breastfeed at the public pool. Then the manager told me I had to cover up/follow the rules or leave. Then a Texas City Police Deputee showed up and made me leave. I’m so hurt, embarrassed and ashamed that this is what Texas City stands for. Their employees should be educated! Their manger could have used this moment to educate her staff! Yet I was escorted out with two 4 year olds and my 10m old on my hip - tears pouring down my face. My son asked, 'Momma why won’t they let you feed MAXX?' I was alone not wanting to cause a scene and scare my kids. To the momma that stood up for me: THANK YOU!"

#NIP #NursingInPublic BREASTFEEDING #AbolishLactiphobia

Bumper Stickers with YOUR year and choice of colors, available at Etsy.


Thank you for nursing in public cards to share with breastfeeding moms you see, and encourage them along the way, available for cost of production at Etsy. Let's support and lift each other up! #NursingMothersUnite




Bumper Sticker Variations other STILL SUPPORTIVE former breastfeeding moms have received.





Out of Milk Since '02. Like a Good Bra, STILL SUPPORTIVE! Normalize Breastfeeding.




Cuddling Babies Positively Alters Genes

By David Neild for Science Alert
Published to Peaceful Parenting with permission

Cuddling Babies Positively Impacts Genetics

The amount of close and comforting contact that young infants receive doesn't just keep them warm, snug, and loved. A 2017 study says it can actually affect babies at the molecular level, and the effects can last for years. Based on the study, babies who get less physical contact and are more distressed at a young age, end up with changes in molecular processes that affect gene expression.

The team from the University of British Columbia in Canada emphasizes that it's still very early days for this research, and it's not clear exactly what's causing the change. But it could give scientists some useful insights into how touching affects the epigenome - the biochemical changes that influence gene expression in the body.

During the study, parents of 94 babies were asked to keep diaries of their touching and cuddling habits from five weeks after birth, as well as logging the behaviour of the infants – sleeping, crying, and so on. Four-and-a-half years later, DNA swabs were taken of the kids to analyse a biochemical modification called DNA methylation. It's an epigenetic mechanism in which some parts of the chromosome are tagged with small carbon and hydrogen molecules, often changing how genes function and affecting their expression.

The researchers found DNA methylation differences between "high-contact" children and "low-contact" children at five specific DNA sites, two of which were within genes: one related to the immune system, and one to the metabolic system. DNA methylation also acts as a marker for normal biological development and the processes that go along with it, and it can be influenced by external, environmental factors as well.

Then there was the epigenetic age, the biological ageing of blood and tissue. This marker was lower than expected in the kids who hadn't had much contact as babies, and had experienced more distress in their early years, compared with their actual age. "In children, we think slower epigenetic aging could reflect less favorable developmental progress," said one of the team, Michael Kobor.

In fact, similar findings were spotted in a study from 2013 looking at how much care and attention young rats were given from a very early age. Gaps between epigenetic age and chronological age have been linked to health problems in the past, but again it's too soon to draw those kind of conclusions: the scientists readily admit they don't yet know how this will affect the kids later in life. We are also talking about less than 100 babies in the study, but it does seem that close contact and cuddles do somehow change the body at a genetic level.

Of course it's well accepted that human touch is good for us and our development in all kinds of ways, but this is the first study to look at how it might be changing the epigenetics of human babies. It will be the job of further studies to work out why, and to investigate whether any long-term changes in health might appear as a consequence. "We plan to follow up on whether the 'biological immaturity' we saw in these children carries broad implications for their health, especially their psychological development," said one of the researchers, Sarah Moore. "If further research confirms this initial finding, it will underscore the importance of providing physical contact, especially for distressed infants."

The research was published in Development and Psychopathology.

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