Thursday, August 26, 2010

Major Milk Makin' Lactation Cookies

Recipe and photos © Kathleen Major for DrMomma.org



*For information on lactation cookies and milk supply, please read this article first.*


Major Milk Makin' Cookies
recipe by Kathleen Major

Ingredients:

1 1/2 c. whole wheat flour
1 3/4 c. oats
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
3/4 c. almond butter or peanut butter
1/2 c. butter, softened
1 c. milled flax
3 T brewer's yeast
1/3 c. water
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 c. sugar
1/2 c. brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla
2 large eggs
2 c. (12oz) chocolate chips
1 c. chopped nuts of your choice

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit


Combine flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt in a bowl.

In a large bowl, beat almond butter, butter, sugar, brown sugar, vanilla, brewer's yeast, flax and water until creamy.

looks a little gross, doesn't it?
but oh, so good ;)


Mix in eggs.

Gradually beat in flour mixture.


Mix in nuts and chocolate chips.


Add oats slowly, mixing along the way.


Place balls of dough onto greased baking sheets or baking stones.

Press down each ball lightly with a fork.

Bake 12 minutes.

Allow to cool.

Enjoy!

"You Cry It Out!" shirts available at Made By Momma

104 comments:

  1. YUMMMM!! I made these with sugar in the raw, and I'd like to sub the brown sugar for something healthier. Suggestions? Does maple syrup work?

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  2. i made these and my DH loooves them... i use lots of flax seed meal, oats and brewer's yeast....he calls them poop-cookies!! loads of extra fiber!

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  3. They look great. When I make these types of chunky, rustic cookie I leave out most (or all) of the sugar and just sprinkle a few grains of raw sugar ("coffee sugar" the really big granuals) over the top before baking. It gives a lovely crunchy texture and the sweetness goes further, so you can get away with only using a tiny amount.

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  4. instead of sugar if you could use syrup made with fenugreek it would increase supply too!

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  5. where can you get syrup made with fenugreek? I would think you could use molasses too and it's high in iron. you probably wouldn't need as much as you would sugar. maybe cut the amount to 1/2 or a 1/4 of what the recipe calls for sugar.

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  6. Cate - all brown sugar is is white sugar with molasses added. Just mix a little unsulphured molasses with your sugar to get the consistency of brown sugar. :)

    I made these with oats and flour soaked in buttermilk. I added some coconut, cinnamon and cloves. I went over board with the cloves. I used silvered almonds instead of walnuts. They are yummy!! I am hoping have all the ingredients to try this recipe the way it was posted next time :)

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  7. some generic maple syrup is made with fenugreek. just read the label, they say something like, water, sugar, fenugreek, and dyes.

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    Replies
    1. Dannielle - Maple syrup is made from the sap of maple trees, and nothing else. What you are describing is fenugreek-flavored imitation maple syrup. The real stuff is better. (Drink your fenugreek as tea, or make curries with it).

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  8. Stevia powder for sweetness

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  9. I would try Rapadura or Sucanut. Rapadura is sugar before its completely adulterated -- basically dehydrated cane juice. There is such a thing as palm sugar but I haven't tried it but its supposed to be quite good for you too.

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  10. Thank you for inventing this recipe! I can't wait to try it! They look amazing. Yum!

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  11. I loved these cookies!!! I made them a couple of weeks ago and when I finished eating that batch I tried another recipe I found online - these were definitely my favourite. And hubby agrees too.
    I'm pretty sure that they helped to boost my supply (mind you, I did it a lot of them!!!), so will be making another batch of them this weekend.
    Did find that the extra fibre turned myself and bubba into farty-bums, lol.
    Will use this as my basic recipe, but excited to try adding other things to it.

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  12. I was wondering aprox how many cookies does one batch make? I need to figure the nutritional info for my husband before I can make them. They sound fantastic! The added bonus would be more milk for me (well for the little boob man).

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    1. Where it says flax can i use milled or ground flaxseed or does it have to be flaxseed meal?

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    2. Flaxseed milled would be ideal. You don't want lil flax seeds all up in your cookie dough.

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  13. Since it has almonds, I'd like to add, that if your child has eczema or if your family has a history of eczema/asthma/food allergies, then staying away from nuts like almond until the baby's immune system is stronger, is a good idea. THis'...s the consensus immunologists seem to be coming to. If there's a high risk for food allergies, then avoid the most common allergenic foods for the 1st 3 years of the baby's life, so the immune system has a chance to mature first. The common allergens most important to avoid are egg, peanut, treenuts,
    shell fish...For details, look at www.foodallergy.org

    So, in my opinion, almond butter in this recipe is not a great idea for a breastfeeding mother. The almond protein will make it into the milk, and challenge the baby's immune system and the baby could possibly become permanently allergic to it. I am talking about high risk babies here, such as ones with eczema (which's about a 3rd of babies nowadays). --Deepa

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    Replies
    1. As of 2012, the latest studies suggest that waiting to introduce allergens until later in life makes us MORE susceptible to the allergy and earlier moderate exposure has been found to reduce allergies. Parents that followed the advice to wait to give children peanut butter (as they were advised by doctors, it made sense with what we knew then) actually created more problems and more kids allergic to peanuts. The older a child is, the more "set" his/her immune system becomes, so eaarly exposure gives the body a chance to say "hey, what's this? Oh, its not bad don't attack." If the body has a first time exposure at an older age, the anser sometimes is "I've never seen this before, it must be bad, attack!" Of coarse there will be people with allergies no matter what route the parents take, so I hope this helps!

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  14. Brown sugar can be unrefined sugar (read the label and check for unrefined). All brown sugar is not white with molasses added. Sugar, honey, maple, etc are all sugars. There is no one 'healthier', except if they are heavily refined. Anything unrefined in moderation is fine for most folk. Mashed banana would work well, or grated apple, or some pureed raisins.

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  15. Dorothy ~ it depends on the size you are making the dough balls, but when we made them for these photos (you can see the size they are above in relation to my son's hand, and on the tray) we had 32 cookies total.

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  16. RE: eczema (I believe there is much to be learned, and a great deal the general population does not know about, and that nursing mothers are not easily able to access reliable information to).

    The #1 culprit for baby/child eczema is cow's milk, or cow's milk products (including formula or mother's milk when she consumes cow's milk). Very often we see eczema disappear when cow's milk is removed from the diet (when babies are consuming human milk and cow's milk is not in the diet of a nursing mother).

    Typically, cow's milk can be comfortably added back into the nursing mother's diet (if a mother desires it) after the baby's gut has closed around the 8th month.

    This recipe calls for 3/4 c. peanut or almond *butter* which is unlikely to impact a nursing baby when baked into cookies in this small among and baby is exclusively breastfeeding or over the age of 8 months.

    Nuts are an irritant in some nursing babies' diet (i.e. in formula produced from soy nuts, or through mother's milk when she consumes nuts/soy) so if this is the case - if baby is young (7 months or less), you can leave the 1 c. chopped nuts of your choice out completely or switch them for seeds (sunflower seeds for example), if you find it increases gassiness or irritation for baby.

    Again, 1 c. chopped nuts baked and dispersed into 32 cookies eaten over the course of many days is highly unlikely to cause issues in a breastfeeding baby. The problems with nuts come more often when mother is eating nuts by the handful on a daily basis (and even then, it is for SOME - not all - babies) or when baby consumes a nut-based formula (most formulas are made from either cow's milk or soy).

    The research suggesting nuts consumed while mother is pregnant or nursing leads to latter allergens is inconclusive, there is just as much valid research that demonstrates the opposite, and I have yet to be convinced that it isn't rather something else that brings rise to these allergies/eczema: The first being non-breastmilk items started too soon (before the 8th month when the gut has closed); supplementation with cow's milk/soy formulas; or cow's milk in a baby's diet at all (even post 12-months).

    That being said, if you know your family has a history of eczema/allergies/asthma, it would be helpful to do an elimination diet to rule out which items are causing these issues for YOU (starting with cow's milk, wheat, nuts) and going from there.

    For baby, I'd plan for certain to *exclusively* provide human milk for at least the first 8 months of life (without cow's milk in mother's diet), to adhere to "baby-led weaning" (baby led starting of solids - no spoon feeding *mush*), and continue non-exclusive nursing for a normal duration of time (several years) without adding in cow's milk to the diet (and possibly wheat or nuts depending on what your own elimination diet found) until you see that your baby does not suffer from the same.

    An excellent book, written for the general population (i.e. not a scholarly journal, but one which synthesizes a lot of the research on this subject for breastfeeding moms/new babies), is "The Baby Bond":

    http://astore.amazon.com/peacefparent-20/detail/1402226578

    Highly recommended.

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  17. I hope you don't mind, but I made these cookies, and detailed it on my blog. They were worth it in my opinion! Thank you!

    http://uniqueandnormal.blogspot.com/2010/12/this-aint-your-average-milk-cookies.html

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  18. I made a batch of these last night and ended up with around 45 cookies and a bunch of chocolate chips left over in the mixing bowl lol. They're delicious and honestly seemed to work almost instantly for me. Even my husband thought they were good. I'm taking some to my sister who is also nursing and am going to pass along the recipe ^_^ Thanks for sharing!

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  19. I got the link to your receipe from Uniquely Normal Mom.. So thank you to both of you! I made them last night and they are really good! I used white chocolate chips and macadamia nuts, super yummy and seems to have helped.. Thanks so much for posting and thanks to UNM for re-posting.. = ) (made about 28 - 2 1/2in cookies)

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  20. Looks like a great recipe. I just wanted to ask: is the yeast a *must* in the mix? or can I leave that out?

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    Replies
    1. I would think that you could just omit it, or replace it with more flax.

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    2. The brewers yeast is the main ingredient boosting supply. It cannot be left out.

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  21. just wanted to thank you for posting this recipe! i've been making the cookies and munching on 2-3 per day (2.5inch diam). I couldn't get the brewers yeast so i omitted that and swapped dark agave for the sugar and no nuts but i have to tell you - i am *busting* at the seams. The flax and the oatmeal works like a charm!

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  22. Try coconut palm sugar instead of the brown sugar. It has a low-glycemic index & tastes very much like brown sugar. :-)

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  23. Maple Syrup

    Fenugreek is commonly used in artificial maple syrup for its color and taste. It surprisingly has a very similar taste to that of maple syrup. Many major artificial maple syrup manufactures use fenugreek because it is very affordable and tasty when mixed with the appropriate amount of sugar. The color it creates is yellowish-brown, so it is perfect for making imitation maple syrup.


    Read more: Uses for Fenugreek | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5384895_uses-fenugreek.html#ixzz1TuZUJC5H

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  24. brewer's yeast - is that the same yeast as used to make beer?

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  25. My sister made me a batch of these vegan-style because my baby is allergic to milk protein. I thought they wouldn't taste quite right but they were still delicious! She added raisons and vegan chocolate.

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  26. Thanks for the recipe, i made some the other night. But they gave me Horrible gas pains. :(

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  27. is it possible to use Nutella in place of the almond/peanut butter?

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    Replies
    1. I used Nutella and it was delicious!

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  28. I made this for our Mommy Meet Up!!! It was a hit! Thank you very very much for sharing this.

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    Replies
    1. I am making these cookies and I wanted to put the fenugreek powder (from the capsules) in it. I already took it out of the capsules, but I am not quite sure how to combine it. Should i just put it in and increase the butter?

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  29. @Anonymous Jan 10, 2012 12:31 PM - Almond butter is the best choice because it contains lots of good, naturally-occurring calcium. Peanut butter or Nutella would basically be a substitution for taste purposes only. Also, consider the fact that, besides a small amount of caffeine, chocolate also contains theobromine, which can act like caffeine in both the mother's and baby's systems. Some moms and babes are more sensitive to stimulants like this than others, so you might want to find out the individual tolerances of the people for whom you're cooking.

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  30. I made these today...we'll see if they work! They make a ton--if I freeze them, will they still 'work' or will they not be as effective?!
    Thanks!
    Kelsey

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  31. Just made them, don't know if they will work for me, but they are delicious! Thank you!

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  32. A lady in our mothers group made them and they were delicious. Can almond butter be substituted with almond milk? if so, how much would need to be added? Thank you :)

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    Replies
    1. no. almond milk is a good sub for cow milk, but if you can not find almond butter you can sub peanut butter or you can get almonds and blend them in your blender until they are paste like. The consistency is much like peanut butter.

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  33. These were wonderful! I made them like the recipe posted except added less sugar as that is my preference and added more brewers yeast. I believe they worked too because I was getting engorged over the couple days I was eating them and never realized until I stopped eating them that my supply went back to normal. Going to make more to find out!! Thank you so much for posting this recipe!

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  34. I'm going to make a batch this weekend. I'm nursing my babe and pumping for my nephew so I could use the boost!! <3

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  35. I made these today and use tahini instead of almond butter as I didn't have almond butter, it was great! I also used rice flour and quinoa instead of wheat flour. Hoe it all works!

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  36. How can I make these vegan and without sugar with the same milk boosting benefits??

    I'm dying to make them!

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    Replies
    1. 1 1/2 c. whole wheat flour
      1 3/4 c. oats
      1 tsp baking soda
      1 tsp salt
      3/4 c. almond butter or peanut butter
      1/3 cup vegetable oil (sunflower, coconut, etc) (may be able to use applesauce)
      1 c. flax
      3 T brewer's yeast
      1 tsp cinnamon
      1 tsp vanilla
      2T flax and 1/3 cup water, mix well and let sit, add during the egg step
      2 c. (12oz) chocolate chips (you can omit these, use dark chocolate, or sub dried fruit like raisins, dried cranberries etc. The fruit would help add sweetness too.)
      1 c. chopped nuts of your choice (not walnuts-bad for supply)

      for the sugar do one of the following:

      heaping 1/2 cup molasses (good source of iron, will give it a strong molasses flavor)
      1/2 cup fruit puree (banana, applesauce, etc)

      1-1.5 cups REAL maple syrup
      3 Tbs water

      1 cup stevia granules (or look on package for sub chart, especially for liquid stevia)

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  37. I made these cookies for the year that I breastfed my baby, I am now a labour doula and make these for clients, and friends. They helped me through the crazy growth spurts that my son had. increased my supply like crazy so that i never felt like I was running low. I have linked my blog back to you with the recipe. hope that is o.k.
    www.radiantbeginnings.net

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  38. Are these cookies safe to eat when pregnant? I'm scheduled for c-section in 3 days and I just want to try them, also I'll have some munchies while I'm in the hospital for a few days.

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    Replies
    1. They are not only safe - but beneficial. Full of good stuff. :) I ate them through my pregnancy when I was nursing my older baby - and loved every one! ;)

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  39. is the brewer's yeast an important ingredient to support breast feeding? Is there a substitution or can you leave it out? I just don't know where to find this. :) TY!

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    Replies
    1. it is full of B vitamins. if you can't get it (look at a natural food store, or order it online) then sub more flax or just omit it. :)

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  40. I made a batch tonight and they are awesome! I only got 21 cookies (I made them to big :-). Can't wait to see if they work for me :-) Thanks!

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  41. Where can you find brewers yeast?

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  42. You can order brewers yeast online they have it at amazon.com for pretty cheap or a health food store

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  43. do you have to use the yeast???????????

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  44. I got brewers yeast at earth fare

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  45. I am by no means a chef/cook/baker, so I have nothing to contribute in terms of what you can substitute, etc, but for those asking if you have to use the brewer's yeast or if the brewer's yeast is beneficial for lactation, yes, it definitely IS a galacta whatever that word is. You can order it from Amazon or you should be able to find it at GNC. I have used the BY in the past mixed in with peanut butter on a bagel to boost my supply, and it did make a noticeable difference for me. Just two cents thrown in from a momma who has had to fight for every drop of supply for all 3 kiddos.

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  46. I used butterscotch chip--delicious!

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  47. I found my Brewers Yeast at Fred Meyer in the health food section.

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  48. Question: I'm not due for a couple of weeks yet and was wondering if it's ok to freeze the dough? I was worried the freezing temp might harm the yeast in the dough and inactivate it or something. Any thoughts?

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    Replies
    1. I don't know about brewers yeast, but for bread yeast you are suppost to keep it in the fridge or freezer so it stays good. In this recipe the yeast is for lactation benefits (it has tons of B vitamins) so if it is inactivated by the freezing it would be ok since it will be inactivated by cooking anyway. HTHs!

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  49. may I ask a basic and silly question about the recipe please anyone? The brewer yeast is supposed to put as 3 Tea spoon right? What does 3 T mean? thanks!

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    Replies
    1. I would like to know how much of an increase if any are you ladies getting? I'm mostly reading that they taste good or the variety of different changes that are being made to the recipe.

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  50. Is milled flax seed the same as ground flax meal? And how many cookies does the recipe make? I made them last night and they are yummy but I'm guessing I made them a lot bigger than I should have

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  51. I made these a while back for myself, my La Leche League, and my cousin. I am gluten sensitive and have successfully made these gluten free by subbing a GF flour mix with xanthan gum, and GF oats. Adding another 1/2 cup butter makes them not so dry. They are delicious, and not too sweet either (a big plus because they are so addicting!).

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  52. Made these tonight and man oh man are they good! My kids love them too!
    My question is how many do you have to eat before seeing a difference?

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  53. I made these tonight for the first time and followed the recipe exactly except omitted the brewer's yeast which I didn't have. My husband and I are eating them now and find them to have an EXTREMELY strong taste of flax seed! Overpowers the cookie. We used 1 cup as the recipe states but I noticed that in other lactation cookie recipes online they call for a lot less flax seed than a cup. Did anyone else think these tasted very flax seedy?!?! No one seems to mention this and I'm surprised!

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    Replies
    1. The cookies need brewer's yeast to bake correctly (and have the galactogogue properties) and the flax must be *milled* flax - not whole flax or seed processed in any other way. Milled flax is the only type that works best. Hope this helps the next go-around. :)

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  54. These cookies have been doing GREAT for my supply for the last two months. I eat half a cookie 2-3x/day usually and keep the extras in the freezer, wrapped in saran wrap and sealed in a bag. They saved me with the stress and schedule of being back at work and not seeing my baby for hours every day.
    I was taking Fenugreek caps 3x/day before, which worked okay, but these work better for me.

    I just opened the recipe again today to make a second batch.
    Highly recommend!!!
    There were lots of leftover choc chips in the bowl after I divided out the cookies, but I mashed them into the top of the cookies before baking. I think I'll try a little bit less choc chips this time to stir in and just add at the end if there's room.
    I did go ahead and grind whole flax seed in my coffee grinder and it worked fine. I think I got flax seed in the bulk aisle of my coop so not 100% sure if they were milled but I think so...
    Also found brewer's yeast in the supplement section at my coop.

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  55. Is there any way to use steel oats?

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  56. I am trying to find brewers yeast, I looked on amazon and there were many different kinds and I don't know what to get. Also can a mother eat these before her baby is born to help milk come in sooner?

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    Replies
    1. I found it a Hyvee (a grocery store in the midwest) so I imagine they would have it at most grocery store, you just have to ask. Or health food stores should have it. I know they are safe during pregnancy but I am not sure they would help the milk come sooner if you eat them while pregnant but it should definitely help if you eat them immediately postpartum.

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  57. Thanks for posting this. I made a double batch put dough logs in the frezer for future batches. I shared them with my sister-in-law and they turned out great!

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  58. Can i put fenugreek in the also? How many capules(opened up) would i have to use?

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  59. Love them, I just put in a backing pan and make bars! Don't have the time for baking cookies. ;)

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    Replies
    1. How long did you bake the bars for?

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  60. I just made these and they're delicious! I'm not crazy about chocolate, so I only put in 1c chocolate chips, and I love them! I might try raisins next time as some have suggested because I adore them. Next time I'll also try using maple syrup with fenugreek or just emptying a couple of capsules into the dough. Yum!!

    For those looking for brewers' yeast, MOM's has it - but it is in the skin care aisle, not the baking or bread aisle!

    How many of these should I eat per day? Is 2-3 a reasonable number?

    I did something a little sneaky - told DH there's breast milk in the cookies and if he eats them, he'll start lactating. Now they're all mine! :-P

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  61. I've tried another recipe and this one is waaay better. I used whole wheat pastry flour, used coconut oil instead of butter, splenda instead of regular sugar, and added chia seeds. I only put 1 c. of chocolate chips. Could use just a bit more oats.

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  62. That cry it out shirt is awesome!!

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  63. Can anyone tell me if it's okay to use quick oats? Got everything else at the store, EVEN BREWERS YEAST (super hard to find in my area...) and I forgot the dang oats!! The quick oats is all I have.... Wanting to make these today!! Thanks!

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  64. Does these cookies really work??
    What is the best Brewers yeast to get and where can I get it? Thank you!

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  65. For me the recipe turned out too stiff. It was too heavy with dry ingredients & impossible to mix it all so I had to add more oil (used coconut oil in lieu of butter), water, & agave (which I used in place of the white sugar). Next time may try applesauce in place of the brown sugar. It helps add a bit of moisture. I also used white chocolate chips instead of chocolate. Next time I'll use raisins or cranberries for a healthier option.

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    Replies
    1. I was hesitant to try these because of this comment, but I followed the directions pretty much to a T and they were a-m-a-zing! Not at all stiff and super yummmmmm. :) Thank you for sharing your recipe!! (Now to go make sure my husband is not stealing more than his fair share!)

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  66. Get twin labs brewers yeast, about $15 for 18 oz (that'll make a ton) and you can get it at most grocery stores in the vitamin aisle :-)

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  67. Can you please post the nutritional info on these cookies? I eat two daily and am wondering how many calories I'm consuming. Thanks in advance!

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    Replies
    1. This would depend on which brands of individual ingredients you are using, as well as how large you are making your cookies. As a result, it would vary.

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  68. can you substitute nutritional yeast flakes or powder for the brewer's yeast? And would it be equal amount?

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    Replies
    1. Brewer's yeast is not the same as nutritional yeast -- the first is a galactogogue and the second is not. So while it may work to make the cookies, it will not have the same milk-boosting properties.

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  69. Silly question - are milled flax and milled flax seeds the same? I have milled flax seeds and I don't care for the smell or taste at all. Any brands better than others? Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. There are many brands available, but all milled flax should taste the same if it is fresh - it should be rather sweet. Some people sprinkle it over ice cream and other desserts to increase omega-3 intake.

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  70. Thank you for sharing such a wonderful recipe! Besides adding nuts and fruit I followed the recipe exactly as written and the cookies were delicious =) The first thing I did was soak my dried fruit (two separate bowls) in hot water as I mixed and separated the batter. Took me about 20 minutes. For the first half of the separated batter I added white chocolate chips, dried cranberries and walnuts. The second half was milk chocolate chips, dried cherries and pecans. And on top of two cookies from each batch I patted crumbled bacon from breakfast! mm mm mm.

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  71. This is my second time making these cookies and both times the dough came out where it falls apart as I make the dough balls and place them on the cookie sheet. I'm not sure if it matters but I don't have a beater so I mixed everything by hand. Other than that I follow the recipe exactly is there anything I can do differently so this does not happen again.

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    Replies
    1. I've never made them without a mixer, so that could make a slight difference, but they are a bit crumbly to start (smashing them together in the balls a bit helps). However, I've also just added more water in the past when mine needed to be a bit more gooey to mix well and stay together pre-baking. :)

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  72. Just curious if I want to add Fenugreek, but I have the whole seeds, should I pulverize them first so they blend into the dough? Also, how much should I add per batch?
    Thanks! Going to try them for the first time today!

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    Replies
    1. Crushing them is always a good idea merely to make them more bioavailable once ingested. I would add the amount you'd normally take over the course of a 3 day period.

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  73. i am a breast feeding mother and im making these cookies, but i was wondering if someone could tell me if its ok for non breast feeding people to eat them.

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    Replies
    1. Certainly! They are great for anyone - my husband and kids eat them along with me. :)

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